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Broner: Pacquiao always gets hit with right hands

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By Chris Williams

Adrien Broner, the clone of Floyd Mayweather Jr., wasn’t surprised at watching replays of Manny Pacquiao get knocked out by Juan Manuel Marquez recently. Broner notes that Pacquiao has never had any defense for a right hand and has spent his career getting hit with those kinds of punches.

Speaking with fighthype.com, Broner said “His name is Plankuiao [Pacquiao]. Plankuiao never got out of the way of a right hand. He always gets hit with a right hand.”

That is true. Pacquiao has always been wide open to those punches, especially in his fights against Marquez. If you watch all four of their fights you’ll notice that Marquez has always been able to sail a right hand through Pacquiao’s open guard to nail him with head and body shots. For some reason Pacquiao’s trainer Freddie Roach hasn’t been able to fix that part of Pacquiao’s game even after all these years with him.

It’s kind of a tragedy because that’s the one area where Pacquiao could have been improved dramatically had Roach come up with a fix for. I know Roach has spent a lot of time on working on Pacquiao’s offense, but his defense really should have been just as much of a focus because it’s an area where he could have made dramatic improvements.

We’re starting to see Pacquiao’s problems now more and more on defense now that he’s getting up there in age at 34. You don’t want to get a fighter that hasn’t built up good skills in this area at his age, because when the speed and legs start to go then there’s nothing to keep the fighter from getting nailed 24/7 because the defense isn’t there.

We’ve seen that with the speedy Roy Jones Jr. when he started to age, and now we’re seeing it with Pacquiao. He might on his way to becoming another Roy Jones Jr. in the sense that he could start getting knocked out a lot like Jones Jr.

 

http://www.boxingnews24.com/2012/12/broner-pacquiao-always-gets-hit-with-right-hands/

Marquez: Wife Has Final Say

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By NICK GIONGCO

Not so fast.

Although he is obviously tickled pink by the prospects of facing Manny Pacquiao for a fifth time in 2013, Juan Manuel Marquez clarified yesterday that a deal is not yet in place for another run-in with the Filipino star.

Marquez, still beaming with pride after scoring the biggest win of his career – a brutal sixth-round knockout of Pacquiao last Dec. 8 in Las Vegas – said he would still ask his wife Erika for permission before deciding what to do next.

Apparently, Marquez had promised his family that the fourth fight with Pacquiao would be his last regardless of the outcome.

But pumped up by his smashing showing, Marquez is being asked by close associates to give it one, or two more fights before pulling the curtains to his Hall of Fame career.

“I couldn’t even tell if I am going to continue with my career for one more fight,” the 39-year-old Marquez told boxingscene.

Marquez said he promised her wife Erika that the Pacquiao showdown would be his last but admitted that he is asking her to reconsider.

Mexican promoter Fernando Beltran said Marquez stands to become the highest-paid Mexican puncher ever in the event he pursues a fifth clash with Pacquiao, tentatively set for September, 2013, in time for the celebration of Mexican Independence.

Marquez received $6 million plus a share of pay-per-view in his recent fight and should get much more if he faces Pacquiao again.

The biggest paycheck a Mexican fighter has been guaranteed was a little over $9 million when the legendary Julio Cesar Chavez met Oscar De La Hoya in June, 1996.

Just before leaving for a South African vacation over the weekend, Arum told TMZ that a fifth encounter between Pacquiao and Marquez is in the works.

It could not be determined if Marquez will take on an interim fight sometime in March or April prior to the megabuck Pacquiao duel.

Pacquiao, who is also vacationing in Israel with his family, is also aching to get back into the ring, telling the Bulletin last week that he feels he can fight as early as April.

 

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/387732/marquez-wife-has-final-say#.UOD_OeTFWYQ

No Pacquiao-Marquez V?

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By Edri K. Aznar

THERE may be no fifth fight between rival pugilists Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez.

Despite reports that promoter Bob Arum is already working on a fifth fight for next year, the 39-year-old Mexican superstar hasn’t decided if he will return to the ring against Pacquiao.

The future of Marquez’s career all depends on the decision of his wife, Erika.

“I couldn’t even tell you if I’m going to continue my career for one more fight, (because I don’t know yet). I told my wife that regardless of the result against Pacquiao—it would be the last fight for me. And when I got back to Mexico, I mentioned to her that I wanted one more fight and she said no. But I’m still asking her to give me permission,” Marquez said in a report posted at Boxing Scene.

Marquez has fought the 34-year-old Pacquiao four times in the past eight years.

Marquez finally won, in an impressive fashion, in the fourth fight just this month after going 0-2-1 against Pacquiao in the first three fights. He scored a sixth round knockout over Pacquiao.

Marquez caught Pacquiao in the third round with a thunderous right that sent the congressman down on the canvas. Pacquiao fought back and managed to knock down Marquez.

However, the ageless Mexican put Pacquiao to sleep with a bone-crushing counter right straight to the jaw in the last second of the sixth round and sent Pacquiao to dreamland.

Marquez’s one-punch knockout over Pacquiao was named by The Ring Magazine as “Knockout of the Year”.

The Pacquiao vs. Marquez IV was also picked by ESPN as its “Fight of the Year”.

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/sports/2012/12/31/no-pacquiao-marquez-v-260740

Boxing’s Biggest Surprises in 2012

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BY KEVIN MCRAE

Boxing is unpredictable.

Oftentimes fights appear one way on paper and end up the opposite when the fighters get into the ring.

Upsets are common, and stars rise and fall as fast as you can reach the count of 10.

A fighter can lose every second of every round and land a shot in the final seconds to win the fight. For that reason, a fight is never truly over until the final bell rings.

The year 2012 showed all of these ideas in a stark light. It was a year of upsets, comebacks and rising and falling stars.

These are the most surprising outcomes in boxing in the past year.

 

Read more:

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1462070-boxings-biggest-surprises-in-2012

Boxing: Pacquiao set for fifth fight with Marquez

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By News Desk

Manny Pacquiao’s promoter Bob Arum has hinted that the Filipino fighter will opt to fight Juan Manuel Marquez again rather than face Floyd Mayweather Jr, according to Sports Mole.

After a draw and and two controversial wins for Pacquiao, Marquez finally beat his rival, knocking him out with an overhand right in the sixth round of their 9th December bout. Arum has suggested that a fifth fight with Marquez is the preferred option, and also conceded that a fight between Pacquiao and Mayweather may never happen. “I think we’re going to do another fight with Juan Manuel Marquez,” said Arum. “That was a great fight.”

 

http://tribune.com.pk/story/486388/boxing-pacquiao-set-for-fifth-fight-with-marquez/

Manny Pacquiao Wants to Fight Juan Manuel Marquez, Not Floyd Mayweather

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By Alex Groberman

It sort of went without saying that Manny Pacquiao’s next item of business would likely be avenging his latest defeat. After all, the move makes a lot of sense from both a financial and pure boxing standpoint. Still, some folks still held out hope that he might target Floyd Mayweather Jr. in 2013.

That idea didn’t make much sense seeing as Mayweather had made it abundantly clear that he wants Robert Guerrero or Canelo Alvarez early next year, however, you can’t fault fans for dreaming big.

This past week, Bob Arum acknowledged that a fifth showdown between his boy and Juan Manuel Marquez was imminent. In a quick interview with TMZ, the Top Rank head honcho said: “We’re gonna, I think, do another fight with Juan Manuel Marquez…He ran into a really good right hand, and we’ll see what happens next time.”

In the direct aftermath of his stunning knockout loss to Marquez, Pacquiao repeatedly said that he wanted another shot at his arch rival. He acknowledged (just like Arum did) that Marquez caught with him a nice shot, and the Filipino superstar seemed eager to regain some semblance of pride.

The only thing that may possibly derail Pacquiao-Marquez V is the latter’s pledge to his wife.

“I couldn’t even tell you if I’m going to continue my career for one more fight, [because I don't know yet]. I told my wife that regardless of the result against Pacquiao - it would be the last fight for me,” Marquez told Boxing Scene.

“And when I got back to Mexico, I mentioned to her that I wanted one more fight and she said no. But I’m still asking her to give me permission.

The deference to his wife notwithstanding, it’s probably safe to bet that Marquez will ultimately give in and succumb to public pressure. After all, Pacquiao give him two different opportunities to avenge his defeats – it would only be right to return the favor.

As far as Pacquiao-Mayweather goes – the super fight appears to have lost a lot of luster. It will no longer determine who the best pound-for-pounder on the planet is. It is no longer the most entertaining match available. It no longer affords both parties the biggest purses in boxing history. It’s still a desirable battle, no doubt about it. But it definitely isn’t what it once could have been.

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/manny-pacquiao-wants-fight-juan-manuel-marquez-not-floyd-mayweather

MANNY PACQUIAO’S WORST MOMENT WAS DEFEAT AGAINST TIMOTHY BRADLEY – BOXING NEWS

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By: Ashley White

While most fans would think Filipino boxing icon Manny Pacquiao’s worst moment in life was his shocking knockout loss to nemesis Juan Manuel Marquez, the truth is something else. A recent interview of the former WBO welterweight titlist Manny Pacquiao was published on Daily Mail. The Filipino icon’s answer to the question probing his life’s worst event was his loss to Timothy Bradley, which happened earlier this year on June 9 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

“Probably the fight against Tim Bradley. If you lose you lose, but I was sure that I won. None of his punches hurt me,” said Pacquiao when asked about his life’s worst moment.

The interview was personal and Pacquiao spoke about a lot of stuff he has never spoken of. For instance, the Filipino iterated that he would have been a tailor or owner of a brand if he was not a boxer.

“I was a tailor when I was younger, so maybe I would have owned my own store. Boxing has given me the platform to get into politics but even without it I like to think a path would have been made for me to get into politics,” said Pacquiao when asked as to what he would have been if not a boxer.

Pacquiao has become the center of attention of many critics and lovers after his knockout loss to Marquez earlier this month on December 9 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. The Pac-man was leading the showdown just when he ran into Marquez’s trap. He was knocked out cold by his all time biggest rival.

It seems like Pacquiao has learned from his mistakes. When asked about an advice he would like to give others, the Filipino stated, “When you think you are 100 per cent ready you’re probably not.”

The advice is more like Pacquiao’s reflection on his past. His last two fights ended up in losses. The first one came at the hands of Bradley, but since it was a controversial decision, Pacquiao was not bothered with it. However, his loss to Marquez was clean, proving that the Filipino is near his career’s end.

 

http://blogs.bettor.com/Manny-Pacquiaos-worst-moment-was-defeat-against-Timothy-Bradley-Boxing-News-a211674

Chael Sonnen Thinks Juan Manuel Marquez Beat Manny Pacquiao Because of PEDs

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By Alex Groberman

Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez both agreed to be drug tested for their fourth fight. Both guys’ tests came back clean. Those are the facts. Anything beyond the reality of what happened is pure speculation and gossip.

With that in mind: a lot of people have been and still are suspicious about Marquez coming into his Dec. 8 showdown against his biggest rival boasting a brand new, much more muscular physique. After losing two fights in a row to Pacquiao because his fantastic counterpunches lacked the power necessary to knock anyone out, Marquez earned his lone victory over his Filipino foe because an admitted PED peddler helped him attain more muscle and strength at age 39 than he had ever previously had.

You will recall, a couple of days after Pacquiao-Marquez IV, I posed the following questions:

How did Marquez, at age 39, come into this thing boasting unquestionably his most muscular physique ever? What role did Angel Hernandez (a.k.a. Angel Guillermo “Memo” Heredia), a man who previously admitted to providing the likes of Marion Jones and Justin Gatlin with performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs), play in helping Marquez attain that physique? Why did an admittedly spectacular right that Marquez had thrown and landed countless times over their four fights against one another knock Pacquiao out cold this time?

Well, during a recent interview with MMA Mania, UFC light heavyweight contender Chael Sonnen expressed a lot of the same concerns.

“Pacquiao got hit by a guy who miraculously went through puberty a second time at 39 years old. He got hit by a guy that showed up with more power at 39 than he had in any of the previous fights. He had a 6 pack that he never had before,” Sonnen said.

“There’s two tests that you have, Jim. You’ve got the pee test, but you’ve also got the visual test. When you take your robe off and you get in the ring that’s your first test. And to act as if all of us didn’t go, ‘Something’s going on there.’ No, I haven’t said that (he’s on PEDs), but I sure came close, didn’t I?”

Sonnen then pointed out that Freddie Roach, Pacquiao’s trainer, also expressed concerns about Marquez’s new sculpted body before Dec. 8.

“I know that Freddy Roach did. I know Freddy Roach said, ‘If that body’s clean, I kiss your ass.’ But you gotta understand, all substances aren’t illegal. Did he take something? Sure, he did. Did he take something illegal? Well, according to the test, no. I just know you don’t go through puberty twice and I’ll leave it at that.”

Again – the drug test results came back clean. As Floyd Mayweather Jr. learned the hard way, accusing folks of being on PEDs with absolutely zero evidence is risky business. That being said: there is a reason so many people are suspicious.

What do you think: does Sonnen have a valid point?

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/chael-sonnen-thinks-juan-manuel-marquez-beat-manny-pacquiao-because-peds

Pacquiao-Marquez IV: Yahoo! Sports 2012 Fight of the Year

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By Kevin Iole

Referee Pat Russell leaned against a wall outside of Mike Alvarado’s locker room on a cool Southern California night in October.

Moments earlier, Alvarado had engaged in one of the best fights of the 21st century with Brandon Rios at the Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif. Rios won by a seventh-round stoppage in a thrilling, action-packed bout that satisfies virtually every Fight of the Year requirement.

• It was extraordinarily competitive.

• There were great momentum shifts.

• There were no clinches, and the breaks in the action were very few.

As a group of reporters left after speaking with Alvarado, Russell called out to them.

“Appreciate that,” he said. “You’re not going to see another like that for a while.”

But Russell was wrong; very wrong. And fortunately for boxing fans, the final quarter of 2012 made a seemingly easy choice for Fight of the Year extraordinarily difficult.

The best fight of the first nine months of 2012 is easy to pick. The sustained action and high skill of the April rematch between Orlando Salido and Juan Manuel Lopez made it the frontrunner for Fight of the Year.
It remained the frontrunner at the end of June, as it did at the end of September.

But in the final quarter of the year, it seemed like contenders for the honor popped up every week.
On Oct. 13, Rios stopped Alvarado in the seventh in what, at the time, might have been the best fight of the 21st century.

Brian Viloria and Hernan “Tyson” Marquez competed in an enthralling flyweight unification bout on Nov. 17.
Robert Guerrero and Andre Berto unexpectedly went toe-to-toe for 12 rounds of gripping action.

And on Dec. 8, the fourth fight of the epic series between Juan Manuel Marquez and Manny Pacquiao turned out to be the best, as Marquez knocked out Pacquiao in the Yahoo! Sports Knockout of the Year.

Suddenly, Salido-Lopez II had plenty of company.

Arguments can be made for each of them, but after a lengthy consideration that included multiple viewings of each, conversations with respected colleagues and a lot of soul searching, one ultimately stood above the other.

Pacquiao-Marquez IV is the 2012 Yahoo! Sports Fight of the Year because it matched Rios-Alvarado in terms of action and momentum shifts, but the skill of the fighters was higher.

It wasn’t hard to predict that they’d put on a great fight. There were already three fights and 36 rounds of evidence to suggest that Pacquiao-Marquez IV would be worth the pay-per-view price and more.

Their first three fights were all breathtaking affairs, filled with the kind of action that would make anyone who saw them a fan for life.

In the buildup to the fourth fight, both men spoke of their desire to fight more aggressively. One of Pacquiao’s most frequently used clichés before any match is “I want to give a good fight for the fans.”

He almost always promises to fight toe-to-toe in an entertaining style. Marquez, though, is a counter puncher who has been in far more than his share of great fights. However, Marquez always needs an aggressor to initiate the action.
This time, though, Marquez was vowing to take it to Pacquiao, believing the only way he could avoid the heartbreak of losing another close decision would be to finish his rival.

As it turned out, it was one of the fights that more than lived up to its billing. They attacked each other with a ferocity that hadn’t been seen in any of their three previous fights. They landed hard, they landed often and they landed not to win, but to finish.

Pacquiao went down in the third round from a crushing overhand right. In the fifth, Pacquiao decked Marquez and seemed to be in control of the bout.

In the sixth, Marquez took serious abuse and was bleeding from the nose and mouth. Many longtime observers felt Pacquiao was a round or two away from fulfilling his prefight promise to stop Marquez.

As the seconds wound down in the sixth, he picked up the pace even more. He threw a right as he moved toward Marquez. The right missed its mark as Marquez countered with a right of his own.

The punch landed squarely on Pacquiao’s chin and he went face first to the canvas. The bout ended in an instant and Marquez celebrated the most significant win of his Hall of Fame career.

There’s room for debate in any opinion-based award such as Fight of the Year. But when considering the action, the drama, the momentum shifts, the stakes and the skill of the fighters, Pacquiao-Marquez IV earns the nod as the 2012 Yahoo! Sports Fight of the Year.

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/boxing-pacquiao-marquez-iv-yahoo-sports-2012-fight-of-the-year-215611307.html

Juan Manuel Marquez: Why Retirement Is Best Option After Win over Manny Pacquiao

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BY MICHAEL MORAITIS

Juan Manuel Marquez’s win over Manny Pacquiao was nothing short of epic, but after such a victory, Marquez has nothing left to prove and should retire as a result.

Many thought Marquez would put up a fight against Pacquiao and that he could potentially win the pair’s fourth showdown, but nobody thought Marquez would knock Pac-Man out the way he did.

There’s no doubt that Marquez’s 40th career knockout was one of the biggest and most impressive he has ever achieved throughout his career.

At age 39, there isn’t much left for Marquez to prove. He’s held multiple titles in different weight classes and beaten some of the best fighters this sport has seen over the past two decades.

So, exactly what can he accomplish moving forward?

Marquez could be hoping for lightning to strike twice and face off with Pac-Man again, but a loss would greatly diminish what he did in their most recent contest.

If he were to lose to Pacquiao, Marquez’s knockout earlier in December would look like nothing more than a lucky punch, if it isn’t already looked at like that in the first place.

Sure, Marquez did lose or draw in the previous three bouts with Pacquiao, but none of those results will stick in the collective minds of boxing fans like the fourth fight will.

That’s the kind of memory Marquez should be keen on keeping in the hearts and minds of his supporters, as well as the many Pacquiao haters out there. He got the best of Pac-Man on that night and that’s what anyone will remember for the rest of time.

On top of that, many have tried to stain what Marquez did to Pacquiao by making accusations that the 39-year-old was using performance-enhancing drugs before the fight.

According to MMAJunkie.com staff (per USA Today), even UFC fighter Chael Sonnen has accused Marquez of using:

“The guy’s got a six-pack that he never had before,” Sonnen said on Showtime’s Jim Rome: Live. “There are two tests that you have. You’ve got the pee test, but you’ve also got the visual test.

“When you take your robe off and you get in the ring, that’s the first test. And to act as though all of us didn’t go, ‘Something’s going on, there.’”

Of course, there is no positive test to prove that Marquez is using, so it is only speculation on the part of his accusers. But sometimes speculation is more than enough to make someone guilty in the court of public opinion.

There is nothing left to be gained for Marquez at this late stage in his career. His win over Pacquiao was memorable. Marquez would be best served leaving that victory as the lasting memory of his great career.

Even if the accusations persist about potential PED use after he retires, there will never be proof. Therefore, nobody can take anything away from what Marquez has done—especially to Pacquiao.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1461850-juan-manuel-marquez-why-retirement-is-best-option-after-win-over-manny-pacquiao

Manny Pacquiao is the Gift that Keeps on Giving for Juan Manuel Marquez

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By Alex Groberman

Manny Pacquiao was very kind to Juan Manuel Marquez in 2012. After nearly losing to him at the end of 2011, the Filipino star granted Marquez a third do-over against the wishes of his own trainer. Then, in the pair’s highly anticipated December bout, Pacquiao hastily attacked one of the best counter-punchers of his generation and got knocked out cold with the whole world watching. That’s what you call being a good friend.

On top of becoming a Mexican hero and essentially avenging his prior two defeats, Marquez did what he did this year while making a whole lot of money.

According to the Manila Bulletin, Marquez collected $6 million plus an unspecified piece of the pay-per-view (PPV) dough for his knockout victory over Pacquiao. That comes out to a million per round, for all you non-math majors. (Of course, it is worth noting that Pacquiao took home $23 million plus a chunk of the PPV dough for getting dropped on the canvas face first.)

Interestingly enough, Pacquiao might continue to be the gift that keeps on giving for Marquez if both sides agree to a fifth fight. During a recent interview, Marquez’s promoter Fernando Beltran suggested that one more showdown between these rivals could earn him the sort of money that no other Mexican fighter has previously earned.

As noted by the Bulletin:

Chavez, in contrast, received his biggest purse – said to be $9.1 million – when he faced Oscar De La Hoya in June 1996.

Given what he made this time around, there is no reason not to believe that Marquez wouldn’t easily top that figure should he and Pacquiao meet again in 2013.

So, for those of you keeping track at home: Pacquiao wants to fight again. Marquez stands to make a fortune. The public wants this match almost as much as they want Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather Jr. at this point. And the only thing standing in the way is Marquez’s wife.

Is there any way this thing doesn’t go down next year?

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/manny-pacquiao-gift-keeps-giving-juan-manuel-marquez

2013 a do or die year for Manny Pacquiao

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By Chris Williams

Manny Pacquiao has had a fine career and you have to give a lot of credit for his promoter Bob Arum by mostly putting him into fights that were winnable ones for him until recently. However, Arum’s excellent match-making is no longer working for Pacquiao, as he’s now losing repeatedly.

Arum doesn’t seem interested in taking Pacquiao backwards towards softer opposition to get him back on the magic formula that had him winning over and over again from 2005 to 2011. Juan Manuel Marquez, who should probably already have four wins over Pacquiao, decided he’d had enough of the poor judging each time he fights the Filipino, and instead took the judges out of the equation by knocking Pacquiao completely out in their fourth fight on December 8th.

Pacquiao now is a situation going into 2013 where he’s lost his last two fights and he’s now in the position where he’s got to start winning otherwise his career will likely be over by the end of 2013.

Pacquiao can’t beat again, and it’s looking like that’s what’s going to happen because his promoter Bob Arum wants to match him up against Marquez for a fifth fight. It’s still unclear when that fight will take place. If Arum puts Pacquiao in with Marquez in June, we’ll likely see him twice in 2013. If not, then Pacquiao will only have one fight next year in September.

Arum won’t push Pacquiao to come back in only three months to fit him in for a December fight unless Pacquiao gets lucky and knocks Marquez out early without getting hit too much. It’s kind of doubtful that’ll happen because Marquez has a great chin, and he’s the one fighting at a high level, not Pacquiao.

If Pacquiao loses his next fight against Marquez next year, he’s going to have to start thinking about retirement from boxing. Pacquiao’s wife Jinkee and his mother both want him to retire because they don’t want to see him sticking around the sport and possibly getting hurt.

It would be a crushing blow for Pacquiao if he gets knocked out again, but he needs to see this as a sign that he no longer has and he needs to retire.

Whether Pacquiao loses to Marquez next or not, Arum is going to look to put Pacquiao in with his rising – highly flawed and vulnerable – star Brandon Rios. A fight between Pacquiao and Rios may help the much younger Rios turn into a pay per view attraction, and obviously that’s something that Arum would like because Pacquiao’s days are clearly numbered in the sport.

Arum needs some new blood to take over for the Filipino star, and thus far there isn’t anyone. Rios and Nonito Donaire bring in good ratings, but it’s highly unlikely that they’ll be able to attract fans when and if Arum decides to ask the boxing public to pay to see their fights.

 

http://www.boxingnews24.com/2012/12/2013-a-do-or-die-year-for-manny-pacquiao/

Roach: Expect no Pacquiao-Marquez V

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By Kieran Mulvaney | ESPN.com

LAS VEGAS — Not everybody is completely enamored with the idea of Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez meeting in the ring for a fourth time. Among them, it seems, is Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach.

“I thought Manny won all three fights. I don’t need a fourth fight to convince me,” he told ESPN.com recently. “But after the last fight, where we got booed so loudly, I think he deserves the rematch and that’s why we’re here right now.”

The reception that greeted Pacquiao’s majority decision win last year clearly rankles. Roach mentioned it again Tuesday while talking to a small group of writers at the MGM Grand.

“I thought Manny won the fight,” he said. “But the booing was very loud and very vocal. Someone said, ‘Why aren’t you smiling? You won the fight.’ And I said, ‘It’s very hard to smile when you’re being booed that bad.’”

Whatever the outcome may be Saturday night, don’t expect a fifth installment of this rivalry.

“It’s the last time,” Roach said. “We’re going to knock him out, end of story.”

On that, at least, he and his fighter’s opponent agree.

“This is the last fight with Manny,” Marquez said Tuesday. “I don’t know what will happen in the ring, but this is the last time.”

 

http://espn.go.com/blog/boxing/post/_/id/1729/roach-expect-no-pacquiao-marquez-v

Promoter says Manny Pacquiao could make more than $25 million from Saturday’s fight

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By Kevin Iole

LAS VEGAS — Manny Pacquiao will make in excess of $25 million for fighting Juan Manuel Marquez on Saturday at the MGM Grand Garden and could reach $30 million if the fight does a brisk business, Top Rank president Todd duBoef said.
Pacquiao’s guarantee on the Nevada Athletic Commission contract is $8.595 million, executive director Keith Kizer said Wednesday. Marquez will earn a guarantee of $3 million. But pay-per-view boxers like Pacquiao and Marquez earn much more than their guarantees.

Pacquiao will get a large chunk from his upside on HBO Pay-Per-View sales, which are expected to exceed 1 million and could equal the 1.3 million sales he reached for his Nov. 12, 2011, bout with Marquez.
Adding in foreign television money, that will easily put Pacquiao over $25 million, duBoef said.
DuBoef said closed circuit locations that show the bout are up from the 2011 fight between them, continuing what he said was a trend in Pacquiao fights. He said that despite the controversial result in his June 9 loss to Timothy Bradley, interest in Pacquiao doesn’t seem to have waned.
“We’re getting more of the bars and restaurants, the chains, the Hooters, the Buffalo Wild Wings, places like that, buying the fight,” duBoef said. “If [interest in Pacquiao is decreasing], I am not seeing it.”

In a study of the highest-paid athletes from June 2011 through June 2012 done by Forbes, Pacquiao was second on the list with earnings of $62 million. According to Forbes, Pacquiao made $56 million in purses and $6 million in endorsements.

Rival boxer Floyd Mayweather was No. 1 on the list, with $85 million in earnings, all from purses. Golfer Tiger Woods was third with $59.4 million in earnings.
Pacquiao and Mayweather each had two fights in the time period that covers the Forbes’ study. Pacquiao fought Marquez on Nov. 12, 2011, and met Bradley on June 9. Mayweather fought Victor Ortiz on Sept. 17, 2011, and Miguel Cotto on May 5, 2012.
A fight between Mayweather and Pacquiao still would be the richest fight in boxing. Top Rank chairman Bob Arum said he thinks it could do close to 3 million on pay-per-view.
Arum said fans are sick of the negotiations, but said if the fight were made, the interest would percolate again.

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/boxing/promoter-says-manny-pacquiao-could-more-25-million-215142324-box.html

Manny Pacquiao Sends Mixed Signals Regarding Floyd Mayweather

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By Alex Groberman

The world would probably be a better place if we stopped talking about a potential Dream Match between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. The fight may happen. The fight may not happen. But everyone breathlessly awaiting updates on it only makes the parties involved more confident that they can postpone the bout indefinitely with no real ramifications.

Of course, despite the fact that we know we should probably stop paying so much attention to this potential match – we won’t. It’s too intriguing. The storylines surrounding it are too salacious. The prospect is too grand.

For better or worse, this super fight will be discussed right up until the day both men retire. (If only one retires, we’ll expect a comeback.)

Pacquiao is currently doing promotional work for his upcoming showdown against Juan Manuel Marquez. In an effort to hype up his big Dec. 8 bout, he has frequently engaged reporters on the idea of fighting his arch rival at some point in the foreseeable future. (It’s a popular tactic, Floyd did it at one point as well.)

Most recently, he opened up about the prospect of fighting Mayweather in an interview with Boxing Scene. Here is a key quote from that: “I already announced everything that they wanted. I’m just waiting for the answer [from Mayweather]. It’s up to him.”

Okay, let’s pause right there. Pacquiao is entirely correct, he did announce everything Mayweather wanted. He gave in on purse split, drug testing, etc. The problem is, he announced it on his terms. Sure, he is giving Mayweather the majority of the purse – but it’s not the amount that Mayweather was requesting. Not even close.

Now, was Mayweather’s initial demand fair? No. Should he have to compromise? Obviously. But Pacquiao is making it seem like he gave Mayweather everything he wanted and he’s still not getting a response. That’s not accurate. He gave Mayweather a reasonable portion of what he wanted, not everything.

Later in the same conversation with Boxing Scene, Pacquiao said this: “That’s a big fight that the fans are waiting for and you guys [too]. They are really waiting to see that fight, and that’s why I said that I’m okay with 55-45 just to make the fight happen…whatever he wants….drug testing….the rules and regulations…whatever he wants…no problem.”

Well, if it was no problem, then this fight would have been made already. If Pacquiao was truly willing to give Maywearther whatever he wants, then he would sacrifice more of the purse than what he is currently sacrificing. Note: I’m not saying he should do that – I’m just saying that you can’t say you’re giving the other guy everything when you’re only giving him a solid amount.

At the end of the day, this is a perfect example of why we have made so little progress over the last few years. Pacquiao and Mayweather talk at each other, not to each other.

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/manny-pacquiao-sends-mixed-signals-regarding-floyd-mayweather

Manny Pacquiao, Juan Manuel Marquez ready for Round 4

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By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — By now, there’s nothing Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez don’t know about each other.
After 36 rounds in the ring — many of which could have been scored either way — there’s not much fight fans don’t know about the two, either.
They’ll probably do 12 more rounds Saturday night, and if their three previous fights were any indication, the decision will be close. If styles make fights, their styles make for fights that can confound the ringside judges just as much as they do the people who pay to watch.
So what’s the intrigue of fight No. 4? What reason do fight fans have other than the possibility of Marquez finally winning to spend money that for a fight that could be as predictable as the other three?
Maybe just because there’s a good chance you’ll never see the two ring generals battle each other again.
“I think this is the last fight with him,” Pacquiao said.
“Last time,” agreed trainer Freddie Roach. “We’re going to knock him out. End of story.”
That might prove difficult because it didn’t happen in the first three fights and the general perception is that Pacquiao is beginning to slip, if just a bit. While no one is suggesting Pacquiao is still not a very good fighter, his last two fights were a disputed win over Marquez and an even more disputed loss against Timothy Bradley.
The line in the Pacquiao camp is that the fighter wasn’t focused against Marquez last time because of domestic problems and that he was robbed against Bradley. They claim he has something to prove, especially if he is ever to get Floyd Mayweather Jr. in the ring, and has been ferocious in training camp.
“The fourth fight could be the same as the last three, but Manny’s hungrier now,” Roach said. “I don’t think Marquez has seen the best Manny yet.”
The rivalry between Pacquiao and Marquez goes back eight years, when they first met for the featherweight title and Pacquiao came out and floored Marquez in the first round. Marquez got up only to go down two more times in the round, yet somehow managed to end the round on his feet.
Marquez would not only survive, but come back to dominate the later part of the fight. He salvaged a draw on the judge’s scorecards, the first of three decisions he felt unjustly favored Pacquiao.
They met again at 130 pounds in 2008 and the fight was almost as close. Pacquiao won one scorecard, Marquez the other, while the third judge favored Pacquiao by one point, giving him a split-decision win.
Then they fought last year at 144 pounds and Pacquiao won a majority decision that angered both Marquez and the crowd at the MGM Grand arena, which booed heavily when it was announced.
“Everybody knows what happened the last few fights,” Marquez said. “I want to be more aggressive this time, but with intelligence, because Manny is a very dangerous fighter.”
That Pacquiao is facing Marquez for a fourth time instead of fighting a rematch with Bradley, who was awarded a decision over Pacquiao in June that was roundly dismissed by most in boxing, speaks both to the economics of boxing and the fact the undefeated Bradley doesn’t have much of a following.
Marquez brings the Hispanic audience, which should translate into higher pay-per-view sales, and he also brings a well-earned reputation as the one fighter who can solve Pacquaio’s somewhat unorthodox style. Marquez might be an aging fighter at 39, but Pacquiao also has been showing the signs of his 17-year career in professional boxing.
And while Pacquiao is widely acclaimed as one of the great offensive fighters of his era, Marquez might be one of the best counterpunchers. All three of their fights have had tremendous action, and there’s no reason to believe the fourth fight will be any different.
That’s especially true if Pacquiao — who renounced his drinking and partying ways after having marital problems last year — trained as hard for this fight as he and Roach say.
“I think he has the fire underneath him that he used to have,” Roach said. “He had four knockdowns in training camp, which were his first since the (Miguel) Cotto fight. He wasn’t so compassionate in sparring this time.”
The fight will be at 147 pounds, a full 22 pounds heavier than the boxers were in 2004. Marquez, in particular, appears to have bulked up, leading Roach to question how natural his weight gain really was.
Marquez wore a bulky coat while meeting with reporters Wednesday as if he were trying to conceal his physique.
“Maybe I’m bigger, but I need to be fast, and I need to be quick to win this fight,” Marquez said.

 

http://www.newsday.com/sports/boxing/manny-pacquiao-juan-manuel-marquez-ready-for-round-4-1.4297420

Manny Pacquiao’s rise to stardom made possible by longtime trainer, confidant Freddie Roach

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By Yahoo! Sports

LAS VEGAS – Manny Pacquiao was hardly a helpless waif in 2005, but neither was he the superstar boxer, influential politician and global icon that he would become.
It’d take a special relationship with a special trainer for Pacquiao to ascend to the level he’s at today.

He fights Juan Manuel Marquez on Saturday in a pay-per-view bout at the MGM Grand Garden that, once again, is expected to sell in excess of a million units and should ultimately earn him more than $25 million.
Pacquiao’s status now is unquestioned, but in 2005, he was just an above average boxer coming off a loss to Erik Morales. And losing was the least of his worries.
He owed millions to the Internal Revenue Service – the result, he said, of an illegal scheme between his managers at the time and his promoter. The fact is, he was earning far less than he was worth under an oppressive promotional agreement that made it unlikely he ever would become a major attraction.
At the urging of his managers, Shelly Finkel, Nick Khan and Keith Davidson, Pacquiao filed a lawsuit against his promoter, Murad Muhammad, and Muhammad’s company, M&M Sports, alleging significant violations in the Muhammad Ali Act.
His career literally hinged on the outcome of the case. If he got free of Muhammad, he would be able to sign with a promoter who could help him generate the kind of money he’d need, not only to pay his massive tax debt but also to set his family up financially for life.
Pacquiao’s trial attorney, Judd Burstein, told him he had a very strong case but that there are no sure things.
“Going through a trial is a very intense experience,” Burstein said. “It’s warfare. It really is.”

Pacquiao had to be prepared to go to war in a country that was not his own and in a language in which he was not fluent. He had been betrayed by people he had trusted and didn’t know whom he could believe or count upon.

He’d been used, he felt, as a human ATM machine by those around him, who watched him torture himself physically to fight for his money while they lived the high life and then took the largest part of his purse. In matters big and small, he was coming out on the short end.
One of the perks for a main event fighter in a Las Vegas match is a large suite. Pacquiao, though, didn’t benefit from that. Muhammad took the massive multi-room suite for himself without telling Pacquiao it was his. He put Pacquiao into a small hotel room that was quickly overrun with dozens of friends, family and acquaintances who stayed with him.
Pacquiao’s future in the spring of 2005 depended largely on his trainer, Freddie Roach. It was Roach who recognized Pacquiao’s brilliance on a January day in 2001 that Pacquiao, on a lark, walked into Roach’s Wild Card Gym while on vacation in Hollywood, Calif., in search of a workout.
Roach’s wizardry helped turn Pacquiao from a physically talented but flawed boxer into a ferocious fighting machine, though he was far from a finished product after the loss to Morales.
Pacquiao and Roach were friendly at the time, but truth be told, Pacquiao wasn’t sure who his friends were.
“Manny had been burned so badly by so many people,” said Khan, who served briefly as Pacquiao’s co-manager and is now Roach’s agent. “He didn’t understand the business and he didn’t speak much English. He’d developed a relationship with Freddie and he started to feel like Freddie was the one guy he could trust.”
Burstein said as he was preparing for trial, he “had a sense that Manny felt naked in America. I didn’t know them before that point, but I got the sense at that point that here at least, Freddie was the center of Manny’s universe.”
Roach saw what he felt were abuses happening. He knew that television networks were paying Muhammad large sums of money to secure Pacquiao’s services, but that Muhammad was paying Pacquiao only a small amount of it. The Ali Act requires promoters to disclose all revenue streams to the fighter, but Pacquiao wasn’t getting it.
Roach brought it to the attention of Khan.
“At the time, I was concerned for Manny personally, not as a fighter, and so I decided to tell Nick Khan, even though some people thought I overstepped my bounds by doing that,” Roach said. “My job was to train him to fight and not be involved in his business. But I just couldn’t stand by and not say anything when I knew something bad was happening.”

After Pacquiao’s one-sided upset victory over Marco Antonio Barrera on Nov. 15, 2003, he asked Roach for advice. He had been in the U.S. for just shy of three years, but was beginning to get the sense that things weren’t right in his dealings with Muhammad and business manager Rod Nazario so he decided to take them to court.
Much of Pacquiao’s success at trial would depend upon Roach. He was the boxing expert who would have to convince the jury that Muhammad’s treatment of Pacquiao was not typical.
Roach hit a home run with his testimony. The jury fell in love with him and the only question after Roach got off the stand seemed to be how much Pacquiao would win.

Marianna Morano-Amato was Juror No. 4. She has since become friends with Roach and Pacquiao and has flown to several of Pacquiao’s fights as the fighter’s guest. At the time, she knew nothing of boxing, but was taken by Roach and the special relationship she sensed between Roach and Pacquiao.
“Manny was sitting there at the table and he was just this very humble, very quiet, very sweet guy,” she said. “Watching the trial unfold, this guy Murad Muhammad was really a creep. As the days went on and the trial progressed, there was no doubt in anybody’s mind, especially mine, that Manny was being taken advantage of.
“As Freddie Roach got on the stand and I began to learn about him, the first thing that was obvious was the tremendous loyalty he felt toward Manny. It was so clear how much he cared about Manny and he wanted to guide him. It was obvious that he wanted what was best for Manny, whereas Murad Muhammad was this creep and a liar who took advantage of him.”
Muhammad settled the case with Pacquiao as the jury was deliberating and has not been involved in boxing since. He was unable to be reached for comment.
In a strange way, though, Muhammad’s actions helped Pacquiao in that they tightened the bond between Pacquiao and Roach. That led to Pacquiao signing with Top Rank and embarking on a career that would earn him well more than $100 million.
Roach was the unquestioned boss in those early years. He guided Pacquiao to a 7-1-2 record in the 10 fights from the time they began working together until the Morales fight just before the trial.
It was obvious Pacquiao was going to be a star if he was promoted the right way, which is why Golden Boy and Top Rank got into a heated battle for his services that led to them suing each other.
Not so obvious, though, was how good Pacquiao would actually become. Pacquiao and Roach worked together feverishly to improve, with no detail too minute to fix. By early 2008, Roach was convinced Pacquiao was as good as any fighter in the world.
“He worked so hard and he wanted so badly to be good,” Roach said. “He was a great, great student. As a coach, you dream of getting guys with his talent who are willing to do whatever it takes to win.”
Prior to Roach, Pacquiao was extraordinarily fast and had a deadly left hand, but he had poor balance, no right hand and was vulnerable to good boxers.
As Roach remade him, those flaws went away. All the time they spent together working on his boxing game and fighting for Pacquiao’s promotional freedom brought them extraordinarily close.
At one time, the relationship was more like a father and son. Now, Pacquiao says it’s evolved to more like they’re brothers.
“Freddie had absolute power in those early days together with Manny,” Top Rank chairman Bob Arum said. “As the years wore on, it became more of a two-way street. Manny matured as a person and became more worldly and he wasn’t afraid to share his own ideas.”
During the trial, the tension was overwhelming. Looking for something to do to relax, Pacquiao, Roach and Khan came up with a scheme. They decided to see who could have the smallest hotel bill.
To win, that meant no charging food or drinks to the room and no raiding of the in-room refrigerator.

“I said, ‘Well, that’s easy, I’ll win hands down, because I don’t drink,’ ” Roach said. “And I didn’t charge anything, so I knew I had won.”
But when he checked out, his bill was far higher than he expected. Not only did Roach not have the smallest bill, he had the largest.
It turns out, Pacquiao had charged things to Roach’s room: Dinners, drinks, services.
“They all thought it was so funny that they got me,” Roach said.
Their relationship will go down as one of the best trainer-fighter combinations in the sport’s history. Arum compared it to the bond between Angelo Dundee and Muhammad Ali, as well as between the Petronelli brothers and Marvelous Marvin Hagler.
Morano-Amato said she’s seen the humility of both men up close and thinks that ultimately, it’s the reason why they are so close and have been so successful.
“After his last Morales fight, it was a very rough fight you might remember, and Manny asked for me to come to his suite,” she said. “He wanted to thank my husband [Gerald] and I for coming to the fight and being supportive. What boxer does that? My first impression of him was of a sweet, humble guy, but the funny thing is, that’s the guy he is in real life.
“And that’s exactly how Freddie is, too. Neither of them wants anything from the other, but they care for each other so much. I’m not surprised they do well together because it’s like they’re on the same track all the time.”

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/boxing-manny-pacquiao-freddie-roach-star-trainer-relationship-lawsuit-204909591.html

Pacquiao-Marquez: Ready for 4

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by foxsports.com

Ahead of their fight on Dec. 8, Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez discuss their fourth meeting.

Manny Pacquiao’s take

If you would have told me in 2004 that I would be fighting Juan Manuel Márquez in 2012 — and for the fourth time — well, I would not have believed it.

But here we are and for a good reason. Our previous three fights have been great; great for us and great for our fans.

Unlike my three fights against Erik Morales, which were fought closer together and at the same weight, Juan Manuel and I have battled each other at three different weight classes and always at important points in our careers. There is a certain feeling of destiny in our rivalry. It was meant to be that we would fight each other four times.

All of my fights with Márquez are important. He is a legend, perhaps the best fighter Mexico has ever produced next to Julio César Chávez. But Márquez does not define my career. My career is defined by many significant victories. World titles in eight different weight divisions and knockouts of Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto, Erik Morales, Marco Antonio Barrera, and Ricky Hatton mean as much to my career as my victories over Márquez.

Champions are competitors first and foremost. They want to win. They need to win. I have put everything into this training camp. I know I haven’t fought perfect fights against Márquez in the past and my incentive in this one is to fight the fight I should fight this time. If I do that I will not only win again but put away all doubts in the minds of the fans and Márquez on who is the better fighter. I want everyone to know the old Manny Pacquiao is still alive in the ring. Speed and aggression will be my main weapons and if the knockout presents itself to me I will go for it, as many times as it takes.

What does this fourth fight with Márquez mean to me? It means the chance to author the final chapter of a marvelous story and to look forward to writing a new chapter in my ring life.

Juan Manuel Márquez’s take

There is something special about fighting the same opponent four times. It tells me that the first three fights have been good and competitive enough to merit one more fight. When it is against an elite opponent such as Manny Pacquiao then it’s even more special and more meaningful.

Over the last eight years Pacquiao and I have fought three times and all the fights have gone the distance. And while people say Pacquiao has knocked me down four times over those 36 rounds, they should say three were in the first round of our first fight, and that he has only scored one knockdown in the next 35 rounds, and none in the last 20 rounds while winning at least 26 of the 36 rounds we have fought over those three fights.

So the question for this fourth fight is, “Do I need to knock out Pacquiao to get the win?”

Well, I will certainly try. I also know that while knocking out a fighter like Pacquiao won’t be easy, it’s not impossible either.

I know that I have to be intelligent, fast and strong to beat him. But as we have seen in the first three fights, it is not just up to me to win the fights. It is up to three judges who score the fights. There is no doubt in my mind that I won all three previous fights with my skills and smarts in the ring, but the judges have denied me that victory.

There is not much I can do about the judges. I don’t pick them and I sure don’t know them. I know most have never trained for three months for a fight, most have never gotten in a ring for 12 rounds with the best fighter in the world, and most have no idea what sacrifices we must make to get in the ring and put on the best fight that we can.

I feel that most people believe that I won our last fight very clearly, but the judges did not see it that way; and by the way, I am not only talking about my fights and judges. Look at what happened to Pacquiao against Timothy Bradley. I was ringside for that fight and I felt that Pacquiao won it but the judges took it away from him and that also is not right.

I just want the judges to score the fight in the ring and not what they think is happening in the ring. I don’t care about the three previous fights and how they were scored anymore. All I ask is for a fair judgment, and if I lose, I lose. But if I win, I want my hand raised that night in the ring.

Pacquiao continues to be the best in the world and to finally get a win over him will make me very happy, but don’t judge my career by these four fights. Take a look at all my 61 fights and then decide where I belong in the history of boxing.

The finale of HBO’s all-access reality series 24/7 PACQUIAO/MARQUEZ debuts on Friday (8-8:30 p.m. ET/PT), the night before the high-stakes welterweight showdown.

Pacquiao vs. Marquez 4 takes place Saturday from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas and will be produced and distributed live by HBO Pay-Per-View beginning at 9 p.m. ET.

 

http://msn.foxsports.com/boxing/story/manny-pacquiao-juan-manuel-marquez-fight-blogs-fourth-meeting-destiny-120412

Manny Pacquiao vs Juan Manuel Marquez Proves Boxing is a Dying Sport

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BY PATRICK CLARKE

The fact that Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez are set to fight for the fourth time proves that the sport of boxing is on the ropes.

There aren’t enough marquee fighters and the one fight that fans are lining up to see, hasn’t, and perhaps never will, happen. Even if Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. do agree to a mega-fight before one or the other retires for good, what’s next?

Three more Pacquiao-Mayweather fights?

Plus, boxing’s loss is UFC’s gain. Mixed martial arts is picking up steam. Not nearly enough to beat boxing, but at least enough to be a contender.

That’s not to say Pacquiao vs. Marquez is an uninteresting matchup, but for them to fight twice in a span of 13 months says a lot about how few intriguing rivalries and clashes are available for boxing fans today.

And even when a fresh new face is introduced, like Timothy Bradley, an outrageously controversial decision casts the sport in a negative light that asks fans to rethink their commitment.

The frustration brought on by having to purchase pay-per-view in order to watch any fights actually worth watching delivers another painful jab to the sport. At least when you shell out the $50 for a UFC event you know you’re going to be entertained.

Yet another sign that Boxing is a dying sport.

Also, boxing is rarely ever discussed on today’s popular sports talk shows (unless it pertains to the unicorn that is Pacquiao vs. Mayweather). It’s almost as if the super-fight between the two best pound-for-pound fighters in the sport is boxing’s last chance at survival.

With the next generation growing up with a more modern form of combat, mixed martial arts, and no more to offer than the feint hope of a sport-saving super fight, it is clear that boxing is dying a slow death.

Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez will entertain inside the ring on Dec. 8, just as they have since their thrilling 2004 draw, but its lack of availability (like all pay-per-view boxing bouts) will keep the next generation of potential boxing fans from witnessing it.

Setting boxing back even further.

So, what’s next for boxing after Pacquiao vs. Marquez IV?

If you ask me, a steady decline in popularity before an inevitable death.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1432577-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-proves-boxing-is-a-dying-sport

Fourth time’s a charm: Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez have little to hide in rematch

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by sports.yahoo.com

LAS VEGAS – Nobody better understands the problem Manny Pacquiao will face on Saturday at the MGM Grand Garden when he meets Juan Manuel Marquez for a fourth time than “Jesse” James Leija.
Leija, the former super featherweight champion, faced Hall of Famer Azumah Nelson four times over a nearly five-year period, winning a unanimous decision in their last bout in 1998 to win the series 2-1-1.
As Leija went through his preparations for that fight, he was flummoxed at times. Leija understood he needed to change tactics, because after having been in the ring with the man known in boxing circles as “The Professor,” for 30 rounds at that point, Nelson knew Leija extensively.
Leija, too, knew pretty much what Nelson was going to do by the way Nelson positioned his hands, by the steps Nelson would take in the ring, by the feints he would use. It became, in essence, a stalemate.

“Some people have this perception that it’s easier when you’ve fought the same guy over and over, but they’re wrong,” Leija said. “It’s more difficult; way more difficult. I knew what he had and what he liked to do, but he knew what I had and what I liked to do.
“You take Pacquiao and Marquez, these guys are the best fighters in the world. If you’re Manny, say, and you want to finally get that decisive victory he’s been looking for, what can he do differently that Marquez hasn’t seen before?”
Pacquiao and Marquez will become the 13th pair of boxers to have fought each other four or more times in their Saturday HBO Pay-Per-View bout. In the last 40 years, it has only happened three other times.
Bobby Chacon and Rafael “Bazooka” Limon fought four times between 1972-85. Nelson and Leija met four times between 1993-98. Israel Vazquez and Rafael Marquez, Juan Manuel’s younger brother, met four times between 2007-10.
The Vazquez-Rafael Marquez rivalry was compressed into a very short time frame. They first met on March 3, 2007, in Carson, Calif. Their third bout was less than a year later, also in Carson on March 1, 2008.
All three were physical, brutal affairs which sapped a significant amount from each man. Having to fight three hard fights in such close proximity took its toll.

“I knew him so well and he knew me, because we didn’t have a lot of time [between the first three fights],” Vazquez said. “By the time we got to the third fight, it was all about who was in the best condition and who wanted it the most.”
Their fourth fight was 22 months after their third. From start to finish, they had 1,177 days in their rivalry. The Nelson-Leija series was contested over a four-year, 10-month span that was 1,776 days. But on Saturday, it will have been eight years, seven months and 3,137 days since the first time Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez faced each other.
The fights were remarkably close and compelling, with Pacquiao usually on the attack and Marquez countering him expertly.
Leija said Marquez is the second-best counter puncher in boxing behind Floyd Mayweather Jr., but he also said Marquez may be the sport’s best technical fighter.
“He’s by far one of the best technicians in the game, even better than Mayweather, and to tell you the truth, he may be the best,” Leija said. “Mayweather is faster, bigger and stronger. He’s got great defense and he can make you miss, and, with that speed of his, he takes advantage when you do.
“But if you want to show someone how to box, teach them how to be a pure boxer, you’d show them Marquez. Not everyone can be as fast as Mayweather and not everyone can have the defense that Mayweather has. But if you study technique and work on that, you can become a great boxer like Marquez.”
Marquez has used that technique to great advantage in their three fights. Pacquiao has been the faster, stronger man and has put Marquez down four times.
Three of those knockdowns came in the first round of the first fight in 2004. Had referee Joe Cortez stopped the bout after that third knockdown, as often happens, there wouldn’t have been a second fight, let alone a fourth.

Both have vowed to be more aggressive in the fourth bout, and Pacquiao trainer Freddie Roach has insisted that because of the controversy regarding the scoring in the first three fights, the judges may exhibit a subtle bias toward Marquez.
“I’ve said this a lot and I’ve talked about it with Manny, but I feel like when the bell rings to start that fight, we’re already going to be down three rounds in the eyes of the judges,” Roach said. “They know each other so well that it’s tough to really be too much different, but I think from our standpoint, Manny needs to be more aggressive and show that killer instinct he had when he was a younger fighter.”
Saturday’s fight figures to be the last between them. Marquez is now 39 and logic suggests he doesn’t have much more time left in the sport. Pacquiao is 33, but he’s a Congressman in the Philippines and his political career is burgeoning. He’s probably going to be around for another 18 months, at most.
Both men desperately want a decisive win, but given the nature of the first three, it’s unlikely they’ll get their wish. So, even though it wouldn’t seem to make sense for a fifth one, don’t totally rule it out if Pacquiao-Marquez IV is as compelling as I, II and III.
“It’s hard to imagine a fourth one,” Pacquiao said, jokingly, when asked if he could imagine a fifth fight with Marquez.
Promoter Bob Arum, though, wouldn’t close the door on the possibility.
“There is a possibility,” Arum said. “[It's] not likely, but a possibility. [Sugar Ray] Robinson and [Jake] LaMotta fought six times.”
The Pacquiao-Marquez rivalry is one for the ages. Years from now, historians will be debating their bouts. Leija, though, assumes he knows what they’re thinking.
“You just don’t want to see the guy [in the ring] again and you want to be done with it,” Leija said. “It’s like, ‘Please, get me someone else; anyone else.’ I fought 42 rounds with Azumah and every one of those 42 rounds were brutal. When that fourth fight was over, I was definitely ready to see someone else and I would bet you they’ll say the same thing [after the fight Saturday].”

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/boxing-fourth-time-s-a-charm-manny-pacquiao-and-juan-manuel-marquez-have-little-to-hide-in-their-rematch-174911705.html

Pacquiao excited and ready to rumble

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By Roy Luarca
Philippine Daily Inquirer

HOLLYWOOD—Manny Pacquiao gave a privileged few a preview of what to expect in his Dec. 8 (Dec. 9 in Manila) showdown with Juan Manuel Marquez.
He was on attack mode in four rounds of sparring, hitting chief trainer Freddie Roach with some hurting punches during their mitts session that officially closed his training camp Monday at Wild Card Gym here.
Roach said it was the hardest punches he’d ever received from Pacquiao, who admitted he put on a show for his fans and friends before leaving for Las Vegas late Monday afternoon.
“I was trying to give a sample (of what I’d do against Marquez),” said a grinning Pacquiao. “I intend to attack him, pressure him. I’m excited and ready to fight. Ready to Rumble.”
While he’s bent on silencing Marquez via a stoppage, Pacquiao said he’s also prepared to go the distance (12 rounds).
“It’s all in God’s hands,” said Pacquiao. I’m just thankful that I feel strong and God gives me the strength through the years.”
Pacquiao reminisced his early lean years in boxing, with brothers and former world champions Gerry and Dodie Boy Peñalosa listening, as he did abdominal exercises.
“It’s been 15 years and I never thought that I would reach this far,” said Pacquiao, boxing’s only eight-division world champion and honored as Fighter of the Decade, in Filipino.
Asked what made this training camp different, Pacquiao said he took on a more direct role in strategizing the fight against Marquez.
“I’m the one who’s suggesting (to Roach),” said Pacquiao, adding that there were no distractions, only more inspirations this time.
Present at the mitts session was 7-foot-1 Ronnie Aguilar, who got waived by the Los Angeles Lakers and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard.
The 31-year-old Gabbard, an Iraq war veteran who won a seat in Hawaii’s state legislature at age 21, was endorsed by Pacquiao, himself a congressman from Sarangani.

 

http://sports.inquirer.net/74867/pacquiao-excited-and-ready-to-rumble

Steve Bunce on Boxing: Manny Pacquiao grudge match looks a real knockout

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STEVE BUNCE

Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez have shared the ring in three championship fights, fought to a gruesome standstill in most of the 36 completed rounds and will do it again on Saturday in one of boxing’s best rivalries.

So far the score is two wins for Pacquiao, after the first fight ended in a draw, but there are many in the fight game that believe the true score should be 3-0 in Marquez’s favour. The three judges in the three fights have sat and scored 108 rounds and their final tally is remarkable: 54 rounds to 54 rounds. None of the same officials will take a seat on Saturday at the MGM in Las Vegas.

“I never wanted the second fight, the third fight and I certainly never wanted this fourth fight,” said Freddie Roach, who has shaped Pacquiao into arguably the best boxer of the last decade. “Manny wanted this fight and he wants to end the controversial series with a knockout.”

The pair last fought in November 2011 in the same MGM ring and the fight lacked some of the intensity of the previous two encounters. However, when it was over it looked like Marquez had finally gained some degree of revenge, but the judges returned a majority decision with two going for Pacquiao and one returning a drawn verdict. It seemed to me at the time that the last result had more to do with keeping alive the fight between Pacquiao and the reclusive Floyd Mayweather, a fight that is thought would generate half a billion dollars for the ailing Vegas economy; Mayweather has beaten Marquez easily but has spent five years agreeing and dismissing terms for a Pacquiao showdown.

“Everybody knows that the last fight was not even close,” claimed Marquez during a conference in LA three weeks ago when nobody in the Pacquiao business said a word in disagreement. “It was easy for me on the night and this time I will have to knock him out.” Pacquaio, according to Roach, slipped him a piece of paper and written on it was : “I need a knockout.”

Eight years ago in the first fight Marquez was over three times in the opening round, but cleared his head, survived and according to one judge won 10 of the 12 rounds. At the end of the fight it was declared a draw – with the judges splitting their vote one for Marquez, one for Pacquiao and one a draw – and a natural and immediate rematch was delayed as Pacquiao met and beat quality fighters and Roach stuck firm to his belief that “Marquez is all wrong for Manny.”

In the 2008 second fight at the Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas, it was a split decision in Pacquiao’s favour 2-1. “If my hand had been raised in the first two fights then I believe that I would be the big star,” said Marquez, whose anger last year after losing once more led him to vow never to fight Pacquiao again. “I changed my mind, I want to retire with a victory over him.”

They have each been in some of modern boxing’s greatest fights, winning titles from flyweight to light-middle and sharing multimillion-dollar nights in the ring. However, they are each insisting that this time it is personal and perhaps in this cynical age, where calculated risks in all sports are rare, they just might be telling the truth.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/others/steve-bunce-on-boxing-manny-pacquiao-grudge-match-looks-a-real-knockout-8382357.html

Miguel Cotto delivers record rating for Showtime, but Manny Pacquiao unimpressed by his performance

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By Kevin Iole | Boxing

LAS VEGAS — Miguel Cotto delivered record ratings for Showtime on Dec. 1 in his unanimous decision loss at Madison Square Garden to WBA super welterweight champion Austin Trout.
Showtime announced Tuesday that its average viewership of 1.047 million viewers and its peak viewership of of just under 1.4 million during the Cotto-Trout fight were both network records. The 1.047 average was Showtime’s highest since Nielsen Media Research began measuring premium multiplex channels in 2004. Its 1.4 million peak was the highest since Nielsen began tracking those numbers in 2009.

One of Showtime’s viewers was Manny Pacquiao, the third-ranked fighter in the Yahoo! Sports ratings and a former Cotto opponent. Pacquiao stopped Cotto in the 12th round of a 2009 pay-per-view bout that sold 1.25 million units.
Pacquiao, who fights Juan Manuel Marquez on Saturday at the MGM Grand Garden, had picked Cotto to win the fight. On Tuesday, he said he felt Trout was deserving of the victory. Judges had it for Trout 117-111 twice and 119-109.
But Pacquiao said he was not impressed by what he saw from his one-time foe. He said there’s been a clear deterioration in Cotto’s skills.
“To me, I see Cotto as different than before, when we fought,” Pacquiao said. “This time, he seemed a little slow and the punches weren’t really hard. I was rooting for Cotto, but I think he lost that fight.”
Cotto’s presence on Showtime for the first time since 2005 helped the network break its boxing ratings record it set in September. On Sept. 15, a card headlined by Canelo Alvarez and Josesito Lopez drew an average of 1.036 million, Showtime’s record until the Cotto-Trout fight.
It’s also why that Golden Boy and Showtime remain interested in a potential Canelo-Cotto fight for the spring.

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/boxing/miguel-cotto-delivers-record-rating-showtime-manny-pacquiao-234936977-box.html

Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather: 50 Cent is No Longer in a Position to Put this Fight Together

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By Alex Groberman

Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. may fight at some point in the foreseeable future. The latter might finally realize that not going up against the only man who is considered to be his equal will do irreparable harm to his career; the former might ultimately determine that sacrificing any sum of money is worth it if that will result in this match happening. Neither of these notions is as impossible as they at times appear.

There is one thing that won’t happen, though. And it’s important to note that one thing now, so that nobody needlessly puts any stock into it possibly happening. What is the one thing that won’t happen? 50 Cent will not be the man who puts this bout together.

That shipped has sailed.

Once upon a time, when Mayweather and 50 Cent were inseparable, it made sense that he could play a middleman role in negotiations with Pacquiao’s camp. He was a respected businessman that was (at most) trusted and (at the very least) respected by all parties involved. He had the political capital to get this deal done.

But then he squandered it.

Whether 50 Cent wants to admit it or not, he no longer has any sort of sway over Mayweather. Zero. The fact that Mayweather essentially refuses to acknowledge 50’s presence these days (all the while 50 can’t help but name drop Mayweather at every turn) sort of speaks for itself.

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/manny-pacquiao-vs-floyd-mayweather-50-cent-no-longer-position-put-fight-together

Manny Pacquiao gives Hall of Famers Charles Barkley, Reggie Miller a taste of fight training

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By Kevin Iole | Boxing

One thing is certain when Manny Pacquiao is training for a fight: He’ll never be lonely.

Pacquiao, who is preparing to face Juan Manuel Marquez on Saturday at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas for a fourth time, always seems to host a flood of celebrities. He recently gave Basketball Hall of Famers Charles Barkley and Reggie Miller a taste of what it is like to train for a fight.
Barkley and Miller chronicled their experience working out with Pacquiao at the Wild Card Gym in Hollywood, Calif., for a half-hour special that will air Thursday on TNT following the network’s NBA coverage.
Miller ran with Pacquiao through Griffith Park in Los Angeles. Both men got in the ring with Pacquiao at the Wild Card, while Barkley spent time with trainer Freddie Roach.
I haven’t had a chance to get a sneak peak of the footage, but Pacquiao was chuckling as he was watching Miller throw — or, to be more accurate, try to throw — a jab.
“As a boxing fan, it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever done,” Barkley said.
Hopefully, Barkley’s boxing form is better than his golf swing. Miller, for all his technical faults, said he enjoyed the time with the Pacman.
“As a professional athlete, it’s always interesting to hear how other elite athletes prepare themselves for competition,” Miller said. “Training with Manny was an experience I’ll never forget.”
The half-hour show, called “Charles & Reggie: Toe to Toe with Manny Pacquiao” will air after TNT’s doubleheader ends Thursday. TNT will show the Miami Heat against the New York Knicks at 8 p.m. ET, with Dallas at Phoenix following at 10:30 p.m. ET.

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/boxing/manny-pacquiao-gives-hall-famers-charles-barkley-reggie-150740619-box.html

In Their Words: Pacquiao-Marquez IV

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By ESPN.com

After three fights as critically acclaimed and hotly contested as the first three between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez were, the idea of a fourth bout almost needs no introduction or marketing strategy as fans of this rivalry have certainly received their money’s worth and know what to expect.

But if there is one thing lacking in this series between two future Hall of Fame fighters, it has been any form of closure after three of the most debated decisions in the history of the sport. The two fighters are so evenly matched and have performed on such an even plane that despite Marquez’s owning a record of 0-2-1 against Pacquiao, there are some who believe the 39-year-old Marquez easily could have been awarded victories in all three bouts.

The series between Pacquiao and Marquez will long be remembered for far more than simply controversial decisions on the scorecards, especially considering the first three bouts — all title fights — were contested at three different weight classes over a seven-year period throughout different chapters of their respective careers.

ESPN.com recently enlisted HBO to gather the fighters’ thoughts ahead of fight No. 4, set for Dec. 8 (HBO PPV, 9 p.m. ET) at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. In this segment, Pacquiao and Marquez discuss their controversial third meeting.

Juan Manuel Marquez

There is something special about fighting the same opponent four times. It tells me that the first three fights have been good and competitive enough to merit one more fight, and when it is against an elite opponent such as Manny Pacquiao, then it’s even more special and more meaningful.

Over the last eight years, Pacquiao and I have fought three times and all the fights have gone the distance. And while people say Pacquiao has knocked me down four times over those 36 rounds, they should say three were in the first round of our first fight, and that he has only scored one knockdown in the next 35 rounds, and none in the last 20 rounds while winning at least 26 of the 36 rounds we have fought over those three fights.

So the question for this fourth fight is: “Do I need to knockout Pacquiao to get the win?”

Well, I will certainly try. I also know that while knocking out a fighter like Pacquiao won’t be easy, it’s not impossible either.

I know that I have to be intelligent, fast and strong to beat him. But as we have seen in the first three fights, it is not just up to me to win the fights. It is up to three judges who score the fights. There is no doubt in my mind that I won all three previous fights with my skills and smarts in the ring, but the judges have denied me that victory.

There is not much I can do about the judges. I don’t pick them and I sure don’t know them. I know most have never trained for three months for a fight, and most have never gotten in a ring for 12 rounds with the best fighter in the world, and most have no idea what sacrifices we must make to get in the ring and put on the best fight that we can.

I feel that most people believe that I won our last fight very clearly, but the judges did not see it that way. And by the way, I am not only talking about the judges in my fights. Look at what happened to Pacquiao against Timothy Bradley. I was ringside for that fight and I felt that Pacquiao won it, but the judges took it away from him and that also is not right.

I just want the judges to score the fight in the ring and not what they think is happening in the ring. I don’t care about the three previous fights and how they were scored anymore. All I ask is for a fair judgment, and if I lose, I lose. But if I win, I want my hand raised that night in the ring.

Pacquiao continues to be the best in the world and to finally get a win over him will make me very happy. But don’t judge my career by these four fights. Take a look at all my 61 fights and then decide where I belong in the history of boxing.

Manny Pacquiao

If you would have told me in 2004 that I would be fighting Juan Manuel Marquez in 2012 — and for the fourth time — well, I would not have believed it.

But here we are and for a good reason: Our previous three fights have been great — great for us and great for our fans.

Unlike my three fights against Erik Morales, which were fought closer together and at the same weight, Juan Manuel and I have battled each other at three different weight classes and always at important points in our careers. There is a certain feeling of destiny in our rivalry. It was meant to be that we fight each other four times.

All of my fights with Marquez are important. He is a legend. Perhaps the best fighter Mexico has ever produced next to Julio Cesar Chavez. But Marquez does not define my career. My career is defined by many significant victories. World titles in eight different weight divisions and knockouts of Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto, Erik Morales, Marco Antonio Barrera and Ricky Hatton mean as much to my career as my victories over Marquez.

Champions are competitors first and foremost. They want to win. They need to win. I have put everything into this training camp. I know I haven’t fought perfect fights against Marquez in the past and my incentive in this one is to fight the fight I should fight this time. If I do that I will not only win again but put away all doubts in the minds of the fans and Marquez on who is the better fighter. I want everyone to know the old Manny Pacquiao is still alive in the ring. Speed and aggression will be my main weapons and if the knockout presents itself to me, I will go for it as many times as it takes.

What does this fourth fight with Marquez mean to me? It means the chance to author the final chapter of a marvelous story and to look forward to writing a new chapter in my ring life.

 

http://espn.go.com/boxing/story/_/id/8695098/manny-pacquiao-juan-manuel-marquez-iv

Manny Pacquiao vs Juan Manuel Marquez: Pac-Man Must Win to Keep US Boxing Alive

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BY MATT FITZGERALD (FEATURED COLUMNIST)

The sport of boxing is in desperate need of standout star power. As critical as this pending fourth fight between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez is, the more renowned Pac-Man must win to keep boxing from sinking in popularity even further in the United States.

With so much focus in America on professional and collegiate football and the emergence of mixed martial arts (and the far better marketed UFC), boxing has fallen by the wayside more and more each year.

It’s difficult to determine exactly where boxing falls on the popularity scale of American mainstream sports, but the best projections don’t reflect favorably for the sweet science. According to Top10Stop.com and TheRichest.org, boxing doesn’t even crack the top-10.

In fact, the latter site rates MMA as high as No. 4. Boxing is still massive on the international stage—tens of thousands of people drop everything to watch fighters like Pacquiao, Saul Alvarez and others do what they do best.

But the star-power problem plagues American boxing even more. There is so much potential for boxing to grow bigger, and it could be coming soon.

According to a report by Yahoo! contributor Paul Magno, boxing is returning to network television this month. Magno goes on to describe at length why the sport left mainstream audiences and was relegated to pay-per-view in the first place:

Back in the mid 70s-early 80s, network TV made the conscious effort to remove themselves from the boxing business. Partly due to boxing’s affinity for scandal, partly due to changing times and standards, the decision was made by network executives to distance themselves from the sport, only going back on that decision on very rare occasions.

…Fast forward to 2012 and boxing has become a full-fledged niche sport as the available fan base has dwindled to a fraction of what it used to be.

While that’s simply a matter of opinion, Magno’s argument has substance behind it—and logically explains why boxing isn’t so popular anymore.

Do most Americans even know who Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather are? Even this Pac-Man and Marquez showdown, which is one of the most hotly anticipated fights in recent memory between two of the generation’s best boxers, likely goes largely unnoticed by the casual sports fan.

Pay-per-view numbers are still huge, and while the increasing prominence of cable networks has definitely helped the cause, boxing itself has not quite caught up to speed.

The new TV contract is a step in the right direction to get boxing in the States back on track, yet it doesn’t guarantee ratings by any means. It seems as though boxing’s heyday has passed, and if it’s on mainstream TV without a high demand for it, people won’t watch it.

This is going to sound like a ridiculous comparison—perhaps offensive to die-hard boxing fans—but remember when the XFL tried to capitalize on football’s popularity with a massive TV deal?

That league dissolved after one season.

All anyone remembers is that Vince McMahon was prominently involved, cheerleaders were unfathomably good-looking and Rod “He Hate Me” Smart had the greatest nickname and resultant jersey in the history of sports.

How about another: Until Rory McIlroy came along, no one cared about golf once Tiger Woods stopped dominating. Even now, very few do, but golf is still more popular than boxing in the United States.

Boxing needs a game-changer to become relevant again in the U.S. If Pacquiao badly loses this bout, it will signal that he is on the decline of his career, making a potential fight with Mayweather less likely despite how amazing it would be.

Without more star power or absolute marketing geniuses to show a cleaner image of the reputedly corrupt sport of boxing, it will be tough for it to post good ratings. The rising popularity of the UFC, spearheaded by brilliant entrepreneur Dana White, will make matters even more difficult.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1431495-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-pac-man-must-win-to-keep-us-boxing-alive

Manny Pacquiao Must Salvage Bradley Loss with Marquez KO

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BY PETE SCHAUER (FEATURED COLUMNIST)

In order to get back into the good graces among boxing fans, Manny Pacquiao needs to submit a dominant performance on Dec. 8 against Juan Manuel Marquez.

Whether or not you feel that Pacquiao deserved the win in his split-decision loss to Timothy Bradley in June of 2012, the fact of the matter is that the fight shouldn’t have been that close to begin with. Bradley edged Pacquiao by a score of 113-115, 113-115, 115-113, which is still regarded as one of the most controversial decisions in a major fight.

There’s no question that the Pac Man wasn’t at his best against Bradley, and in order to get back on top of the boxing world, Pacquiao needs to knock out Marquez.

December of 2012 will mark the fourth time Pacquiao and Marquez have gone toe-to-toe in the boxing ring, and although Pacquiao has never lost a match to Marquez on paper, some may see it differently.

The first match between Pac Man and the Dinamita ended in a draw, while Pacquiao won the next two in controversial decisions.

Fresh in the minds of boxing fans is fight No. 3 in November of 2011, when Marquez was robbed of a win by the judges. They scored the match a majority-decision win for Pacquiao, which you can see highlights of above (h/t YouTube).
Fans of both boxers will argue to no end that their guy won, but there’s still a lot of speculation surrounding who the clear victor was of that fight.

If Pacquiao is able to KO Marquez, I think fans will begin to forget about his loss to Bradley and go back to focusing on his reigning dominance atop the boxing world. None of the three fights have seen Pacquiao really establish a defining moment of dominance over Marquez, but a KO would do just that.

A knockout of JMM would silence all of Pacquiao’s haters who believe that Pacquiao didn’t rightfully earn his past two wins over Marquez.
If Pac Man fails to KO Marquez and wins in what turns out to be another controversial scoring decision, Pacquiao’s detractors will never relinquish their stranglehold on his career.

The only way for Pacquiao to re-establish his dominance across the boxing landscape is to KO Marquez and solidify himself as the clear victor in the Pacquiao vs. Marquez saga.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1431716-manny-pacquiao-must-salvage-bradley-loss-with-marquez-ko

Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez: Revisiting Their Epic First Fight

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BY KEVIN MCRAE (FEATURED COLUMNIST)

When Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez met for the first time in May of 2004, nobody envisioned the rivalry that would develop between the two legends.

At the time, Pacquiao was still a rising star, having just burst onto the scene in a big way with a stunning blitz of Mexican legend, and at the time top five fighter, Marco Antonio Barrera.

Marquez, on the other hand, was a dangerous and avoided fighter who was considered too high-risk and low-reward for most.

This fight would, in many ways, set the tone for the entire rivalry that was to follow. Read on as we break down the first fight of this legendary rivalry.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1427677-pacquiao-vs-marquez-revisiting-their-epic-first-fight

Manny Pacquiao: What 4th Marquez Fight Means for Boxing Legend’s Legacy

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BY SHAWN BRUBAKER (FEATURED COLUMNIST)

When Manny Pacquiao takes center stage once again to fight Juan Manuel Marquez in a rematch for the ages, for the first time in years, Pacquiao has something to prove after a controversial loss to Timothy Bradley.

Despite this loss, his legacy as one of the world’s greatest boxers ever can be cemented with a convincing win over Marquez.

There is no doubt left that Pacquiao is heading to the Hall of Fame, but he has a chance to return to the stretch of dominance he previously had, a stretch that was among the most successful in boxing history.

Despite that dominance, Pacquiao has never really dominated Marquez. In three bouts, Pacquiao is undefeated against the Mexican legend, but Pacquiao has not dominated the series. On the contrary, every bout between the two has been controversial and close.

On the surface, a big win for Pacquiao would be a chance to prove once and for all that he is the victor in this series. Most simply, it would put Pacquiao at 55 career wins, one above Marquez. More importantly, though, a draw and two close wins in the series is not exactly dominance. A dominating performance in the fourth bout would cement Pacquiao’s status as the better boxer.

More importantly in the long term, Pacquiao needs to come back strongly from his controversial loss to Timothy Bradley if he ever wants a shot at Floyd Mayweather.

This fight has been flirted with for years, but it will never happen unless Pacquiao forces Mayweather’s hand with wins. As long as Pacquiao keeps winning, his star will still be the biggest in boxing, and that will put him squarely on a collision course with Mayweather.

A loss against Marquez, though, would be a big blow for a career probably on the decline. Pacquiao isn’t as fast as he once was, and his stamina has fallen drastically. A loss to an opponent he has never lost to would cement this decline.

Further, a Pacquiao loss could even make boxing pundits look back at the past through different lenses. It would call into question his previous wins over Marquez and giving more credence to the decision that gave Bradley the win over Pacquiao.

A win is crucial for Pacquiao, but looking like a winner is even more important to his long-term aspirations. If Pacquiao wants to be remembered as truly the best, he needs a chance to defeat Mayweather. He won’t get that chance if he doesn’t show up against Marquez.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429529-manny-pacquiao-what-4th-marquez-fight-means-for-boxing-legends-legacy

Manny Pacquiao Must Not Retire Following Fourth Bout with Juan Manuel Marquez

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BY STEVE SILVERMAN (FEATURED COLUMNIST)

Manny Pacquiao is a man with options once his boxing career comes to an end.

Pacquiao, 33, started working on those options years ago. He may not be looked at seriously in some circles, but Pacquiao is a politician who has been elected to office in his native Philippines.

He is also a singer and an actor.

More than any one single activity, Pacquiao appears to be a warm and caring individual who is concerned with human rights and helping the down-trodden members of society.

Unlike many athletes, Pacquiao is concerned with the outside world and he seems to want to help those who don’t have opportunities to take care of themselves and their families.

Having political and show business aspirations are admirable for a boxer who has come to the conclusion of his career and Pacquiao deserves credit for planning for the ending that all fighters must eventually face.

However, it’s not time for him to retire from the sport after he fights Juan Manuel Marquez for the fourth time.

It’s not that he has to keep fighting for his own legacy; Pacquiao needs to keep fighting for the good of the sport.

Along with Floyd “Money” Mayweather, Pacquiao is one of the two most popular and well-known figures in professional boxing.

There are other solid fighters who approach those two in terms of popularity and ability, but they don’t exceed what Mayweather and Pacquiao have done in the ring.

The idea that those two will meet in the ring has not yet faded. Boxing fans have been longing for this matchup for several years, but it has not come about for several reasons.

The biggest of those reasons is most likely Mayweather’s ego. He has wanted the lion’s share of the purse and billing. As a result, the two fighters have been waltzing around this potential super fight instead of meeting in the ring (h/t BoxingNews24.com).

Aside from a meeting with Mayweather, Pacquiao’s action-packed style is simply good for the sport. Pacquiao is a smart, aggressive and talented fighter who will take a punch or two in order to launch a combination.

He is not reckless in the ring, but he is courageous. He can and will take punishment if he has to and then dish it out in spectacular fashion.

More than anything, Pacquiao’s style is usually crowd pleasing.

The sport needs him because he has talent, charisma and he fights with integrity.

Whether he and Mayweather meet in a long-awaited bout or not, when Pacquiao gets in the ring, the spotlight focuses on the sport of boxing.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429566-manny-pacquiao-must-not-retire-following-fourth-bout-with-juan-manuel-marquez

Manny Pacquiao Ends Training in LA With Reception

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by Ronnie Nathanielsz

Congressman Manny Pacquiao ends his eight weeks of grueling training for his fourth battle with Mexican legend Juan Manuel Marquez at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas by hosting a media reception for Democratic congresswoman-elect Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii.

The reception will be held at the Wild Card Gynm of trainer Freddie Roach at 2:00 p.m. on Monday, Los Angeles Time.

Boxing’s eight division world champion Pacquiao who represents the lone district of Sarangani in the Philippine House of Representatives had endorsed Ms. Gabbard’s candidacy which ended up mwith a ,landslide victory in the November elections and a chance to represent Hawaii’s 2nd District.

The 31 year old Gabbard is an Iraq war veteran who served two tours. Her earliest success in Hawaii politics came in 2002, when she was elected to the state House of Representatives. Just 21 years old at the time, she was the youngest person ever elected to the Hawaii state legislature.

Gabbard will be the first Hindu congresswoman while another Democrat also from Hawii, Mazie Hirono will become the first Buddhist senator.

Tulsi Gillard’s campaign spokesman Jim McCoy was quoted as saying that “Tulsi never ran as a Hindu or thought of the campaign in that way. However, after her victory there was a huge outpourinbg of joy from Hindus throughout American and even in India.”

The spokesman said “although Tulsi has never seen it as a victory for Hindus. Its clear that Hindus in America now feel less marginalized than they had prior to her election.

Following his reception with Congresswoman-elect Gabbard, Team Pacquiao will make its traditional road trip to Las Vegas in a luxury bus custom-designed with Pacquiao’s image on all four sides.

 

http://www.boxingscene.com/manny-pacquiao-ends-training-la-with-reception-60039

Manny Pacquiao on TNT Thursday Night

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By thesweetscience.com

TNT’s Charles Barkley and Reggie Miller Go Toe-to-Toe with Manny Pacquiao on Thursday, Dec. 6

Turner Sports and HBO Sports are teaming up to present Charles & Reggie: Toe to Toe with Manny Pacquiao, televised exclusively on TNT on Thursday, Dec. 6. The 30-minute show, airing immediately following the network’s NBA coverage, will feature TNT analysts and NBA Hall of Famers Charles Barkley and Reggie Miller spending a day with Manny Pacquiao at the gym in Hollywood, Calif., where he is training for his upcoming fight. Pacquiao (54-4-2, 38 KOs) will face archrival Juan Manuel Marquez (54-6-1, 39 KOs) in the HBO Pay-Per-View® mega-fight on Saturday, Dec. 8, from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. The fight is the boxers’ fourth meeting in their epic rivalry.

Show highlights include:

· Miller joining Pacquiao on his morning run through Griffith Park in Los Angeles.

· Barkley spending time with Pacquiao’s Hall of Fame trainer, Freddie Roach, at the famed Wild Card Gym.

· Barkley and Miller dropping in on one of Pacquiao’s intense training sessions.

“As a boxing fan, it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever done,” said Barkley. Miller added, “As a professional athlete, it’s always interesting to learn how other elite athletes prepare themselves for competition. Training with Manny was an experience I’ll never forget.”

Earlier Thursday evening, TNT’s NBA coverage will feature the Miami Heat hosting the New York Knicks at 8 p.m. ET, followed by the Dallas Mavericks visiting the Phoenix Suns at 10:30 p.m.

 

http://www.thesweetscience.com/news/articles/15713-manny-pacquiao-on-tnt-thursday-night

Manny Pacquiao vs. Brandon Rios is Still a Possibility for 2013

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By Alex Groberman

Manny Pacquiao will take on Juan Manuel Marquez for the fourth time in eight years this Saturday. The stakes are pretty clear. If he loses, his career is all but over. Getting defeated because a couple of incompetent judges inexplicably decided to make a statement is one thing; two consecutive losses (regardless of how they happen) is a whole different animal. If Pacquiao loses to Marquez, for all intents and purposes, his career as a legitimate top-tier pound-for-pounder will be over.

If he wins, though, then all attention will quickly turn to who his next opponent will be.

You will recall, in early October, right before Brandon Rios and Mike Alvarado were set to clash, Bob Arum announced that the winner of that bout might earn a shot at Pacquiao in 2013. (It sort of went without saying that the idea was contingent how good the winner looked in victory.) Well, not only did Rios win – he won in dominant fashion.

In the aftermath, some began buzzing about a potential Pacquiao versus Rios showdown; however, it never seemed like people really got behind the idea. Be it because Rios is still relatively unknown amongst less in the loop boxing fans, or because folks didn’t think this match would be a good one stylistically, the possibility of this fight being made in 2013 never really picked up much steam.

Recently, Chris Robinson of The Examiner spoke with Rios about a number of things – including potentially fighting Pacquiao. It was a fascinating conversation and you should definitely read the whole thing, but check out the sections pertaining to a possible fight versus Manny below.

Open to a match with Manny Pacquiao…
“If Bob Arum and Cameron Dunkin want me to fight Manny Pacquiao next, I’ll fight him. Go up to 147, win that fight, come back down to 140, clean out 140, and then go back to 147. It’s not like it’s going to be hard for me to make 147. As you can see, I make 140 pretty comfortably. 147 would be the same sh*t. I’ll clean both divisions out, why not?”

Whether or not Pacquiao’s heart is still in boxing…
“Yeah, why not? If he’s still fighting, why not? That means his heart is still in the game. He’s got a tough test in front of him, that’s Marquez again. That’s going to be a great fight. We’ll be at that fight.”

Finding a way to beat Pacquiao…
“What’s it going to take to beat Manny Pacquiao? What I’ve been doing for the last, since I’ve been boxing, for eight years. Pressure, pressure, pressure. Fight, fight, fight. Keep coming, don’t stop. I’m the next Julio Cesar Chavez Sr. I’m the next one coming up and I’m just ready to be the best out there.

Rios’ responses were intriguing for a couple of reasons. First, obviously he is interested in the fight – and understandably so. It could mean the biggest payday of his career, plus a good bit of notoriety from boxing’s mainstream fans that may not have been following his career up to now. The other reason it was intriguing, though, is because he isn’t pressing matters. He’s being respectful. You don’t see him calling Pacquiao out or throwing a Timothy Bradley-like tantrum – he knows patience is key. If Bob Arum and Cameron Dunkin want me to fight Manny Pacquiao next… is a lot different than what other fighters in Rios’ position would say.

Presuming Pacquiao beats Marquez next week, his options as far as next bout go are pretty limited. Miguel Cotto’s recent loss takes him out of the 2013 equation. Floyd Mayweather has more or less committed to fighting someone else. Who is left besides Rios? Bradley?

What do you think: who is the best possible foe for Pacquiao in 2013?

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/manny-pacquiao-vs-brandon-rios-still-possibility-2013

Pacquiao/Marquez IV: Is This the Last Hurrah for Manny and Juan Manuel?

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BY DEVIN HIGGINS (CONTRIBUTOR)

When they first touched gloves in 2004 at the MGM Grand, Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez put on a show that opened the eyes of a lot of people in boxing. Pacquiao, the Filipino phenom, showed he was going to be a force in the sport for the next decade. Marquez, a proud Mexican fighter who’d gone overlooked in the shadow of both Marco Antonio Barrera and Erik Morales, showed that he would be one of the most durable and smartest fighters of his era.

We know how that fight ended, a draw. We also know how the subsequent two fights in 2008 and 2011 ended, Pacquiao victories which have been questioned and debated ever since.

Now we come to the rare fourth fight between two men who are tailor-made for one another. The last time we saw this wasn’t too long ago and involved another Marquez. After a truly epic third fight to cap their legendary trilogy, Israel Vasquez met Juan Manuel’s little brother, Rafael, for an unwarranted fourth time in May 2010, and it ended his career. He was knocked out after going down twice in the third round, evening the series at 2-2 and showing that the rivalry had more than run its course.

At age 39, Juan Manuel Marquez shouldn’t be where he’s at in the sport. Historically, fighters who’ve been in as many wars as he has fade much quicker and their body simply cannot produce at the same level it did in their prime. But that’s what makes him such a great and dangerous opponent. His preparation is as renowned as his cerebral approach to the fight game and his ability to get put on the canvas, get up, shake it off and then pick his opponents apart.

Pacquiao, meanwhile, may finally be stepping back into the ring with something to prove not only his critics, but to himself as well. I went on record before the third fight in saying the killer instinct which he displayed so amazingly through his career may have finally ebbed in favor of being a polished fighter. Moreover, based on his performance against Marquez last year, I think Pacquiao was very lucky to get that decision, because I thought the case could be made that Marquez not only outsmarted him, but outboxed him as well.

Now, following the still incomprehensible decision loss to Timothy Bradley on June 9, and the ever expanding political aspirations, Manny Pacquiao does not have many more reasons to get back in the ring. Even though at 33, he’s capable of being a challenge for anyone who stands across from him, it is clear that if he was to retire after this fight, he wouldn’t have much else to prove.

“Wait, wait, wait!” I hear you shouting. “What about Mayweather?” What about it? The window on that fight is shut and there’s no incentive to open it. Mayweather made his demands, Pacquiao made his, and the fight we all wanted to see never materialized. It’s over. Let it go.

The message from the Pacquiao camp has been consistent, as Freddie Roach likes it to be. Manny’s in great shape, the past distractions are gone and they have a singular focus to knock Marquez out and put a definitive cap on the rivalry once and for all.

Marquez, meanwhile, is sticking to his guns in saying it should be he, not Pacquiao, who won the first three fights and he will step into the ring Saturday night to make sure this time he will walk out with the victory.

Two of the greatest fighters of their generation will come together one more time at the MGM Grand Saturday night, with no title on the line. It will just be two men getting together one more time and trying to decide once and for all, who’s the best.

Either way, if the fight lives up to the previous three, it may be the perfect swan song for both Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1431550-pacquiaomarquez-iv-is-this-the-last-hurrah-for-manny-and-juan-manuel

Manny Pacquiao vs Cotto what could have been.

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(ThyBlackMan.com)

Well Miguel Cotto (37-4, 30 KO’s) received $1 million plus a percentage of the Puerto Rican pay per view money for his 12 round decision loss to WBA World junior middleweight champion Austin Trout (26-0, 14 KO’s) last Saturday night. While that may seem like good money for the average person you have to remember that Cotto turned down a big money rematch with Manny Pacquiao that would have likely given him many times that amount.

Had Cotto said yes to the fight with Manny Pacquiao, he still may have lost as he did last Saturday, but he’d have gotten big cash and the sting from losing to Manny Pacquiao would be less than it is from Trout. Manny Pacquiao is a huge star, so it’s not as bad losing to someone like him compared to the much lesser known Trout.

For Cotto to get the rematch with Manny Pacquiao, he’d have had to give in to the weight requirements that Manny Pacquiao wanted. However, it’s still hard to fathom Cotto turning down all that money to face Pacquiao, and then turning around and fighting a dangerous guy like Trout for much less cash. That doesn’t make sense, but Cotto much have felt pretty confident in his abilities that he could win the fight and then get a big money bout against one of the top fighters.
It’s hard to say what Cotto does now. Based on how looked against Trout, it might not be a smart thing for Cotto to try and fight Canelo Alvarez right now. Even if the money is good, Cotto should look to rebuild himself with some confidence boosting fights.
The only reason I could see him choosing not to do this is if Manny Pacquiao or Mayweather offered him a rematch. If that would happen then of course he should take it, because it could be his last chance at a big payday. However, I think that’s highly unlikely now with Cotto’s loss to Trout. The way Cotto lost to Trout would likely hurt pay per view sales if Manny Pacquiao or Mayweather selected him for a fight right about now.
It’s nothing new for boxers to make bad decisions. Look at Saul Alvarez. He chose not to fight in December thinking he’d get a big name – Cotto, Floyd Mayweather Jr. or Sergio Martinez – to fight him next May. It’s liking more and more like Alvarez will have nothing to show for his blunder because the only fighter that he can possibly get from that bunch is Cotto, who will be coming off of two straight losses.

 

http://thyblackman.com/2012/12/03/manny-pacquiao-vs-cotto-what-could-have-been/

Lem’s latest: Pacquiao trains for former NBA stars Barkley, Miller

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by Lem Satterfield

Manny Pacquiao will spend a day with former NBA stars Charles Barkley and Reggie Miller as Turner Sports and HBO Sports join forces to present Charles and Reggie: Toe to Toe with Manny Pacquiao, a 30-minute show to be televised on TNT on Thursday.

The broadcast will follow the network’s NBA coverage and will include Barkley and Miller visiting Pacquiao at The Wild Card Boxing Gym in Hollywood, Calif., as he prepares with five-time Trainer of the Year Freddie Roach for his fourth bout with Juan Manuel Marquez that will happen on HBO Pay Per View at The MGM Grand on Saturday night.

“As a boxing fan,” said Barkley, “it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever done.”

Among the show’s highlights will be Miller joining Pacquiao on his morning run through Griffith Park in Los Angeles, Barkley sharing time with Roach, and both Hall of Fame players dropping in on one of Pacquiao’s training sessions.

“As a professional athlete, it’s always interesting to learn how other elite athletes prepare themselves for competition,” said Miller. “Training with Manny was an experience I’ll never forget.”

The Pacquiao footage will follow TNT’s NBA coverage of the Miami Heat playing host to the New York Knicks at 8 p.m. ET, followed by the Dallas Mavericks visiting the Phoenix Suns at 10:30 p.m.

PACQUIAO IN ‘WONDERFUL PISTACHIOS’ AD

Pacquiao will also be featured in an ad for “Wonderful Pistachios” that will debut during “Monday Night Football” and then again later on “Late Show with David Letterman” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” according to Bill King of the Sports Business Journal.

The 15-second TV spot opens with Pacquiao rhythmically hitting a green speed bag to music. When he unleashes a hard left hand, the bag explodes, spraying hundreds of pistachio nuts into the air.

“Manny Pacquiao does it,” says the narrator, seconds before impact, “with a knockout punch.”

MARQUEZ: ‘DO I NEED TO KNOCK OUT PACQUIAO TO WIN?’

Marquez and Pacquiao have been sharing their thoughts from training camp with HBO as they enter their fourth fight. In November, Marquez (54-6-2, 39 knockouts) lost a highly disputed majority decision to Pacquiao (54-4-2, 38 KOs), with whom he has also battled to a draw and lost a previous split decision.

Pacquiao floored Marquez three times in the first round of their initial meeting as featherweights in May of 2004, and dropped him once in the third round of their second as junior lightweights in March of 2008.

Pacquiao, who turns 34 on Dec. 17, chose to face Marquez over a return bout with Tim Bradley, whose controversial split decision in June dethroned Pacquiao as the WBO’s 147-pound titleholder and ended his 15-bout winning streak that included eight stoppages.

Marquez, who turned 39 in August, rebounded with April’s unanimous decision over Sergei Fedchenko for the WBO’s junior welterweight belt.

In this training blog distributed by HBO, Marquez talks about Saturday night’s contest with Pacquiao:

FRIDAY, NOV. 30: “There is something special about fighting the same opponent four times. It tells me that the first three fights have been good and competitive enough to merit one more fight, and when it is against an elite opponent such as Manny Pacquiao, then it’s even more special and more meaningful. Over the last eight years, Pacquiao and I have fought three times, and all the fights have gone the distance.

“And while people say Pacquiao has knocked me down four times over those 36 rounds, they should say three were in the first round of our first fight, that he has only scored one knockdown in the next 35 rounds, and none in the last 20 rounds while winning at least 26 of the 36 rounds we have fought over those three fights. So the question for this fourth fight is, ‘Do I need to knock out Pacquiao to get the win?’

“Well I will certainly try. I also know that while knocking out a fighter like Pacquiao won’t be easy, it’s not impossible either. I know that I have to be intelligent, fast and strong to beat him. But as we have seen in the first three fights, it is not just up to me to win the fights. It is up to three judges who score the fights. There is no doubt in my mind that I won all three previous fights with my skills and smarts in the ring, but the judges have denied me that victory.

“There is not much I can do about the judges. I don’t pick them and I sure don’t know them. I know most have never trained for three months for a fight, and most have never gotten in a ring for 12 rounds with the best fighter in the world, and most have no idea what sacrifices we must make to get in the ring and put on the best fight that we can. I feel that most people believe that I won our last fight very clearly, but the judges did not see it that way.

“And by the way, I am not only talking about my fights and judges. Look at what happened to Pacquiao against Timothy Bradley. I was ringside for that fight, and I felt that Pacquiao won it, but the judges took it away from him and that also is not right. I just want the judges to score the fight in the ring and not what they think is happening in the ring. I don’t care about the three previous fights and how they were scored anymore.

“All I ask is for a fair judgment, and if I lose I lose. But if I win, I want my hand raised that night in the ring. Pacquiao continues to be the best in the world, and to finally get a win over him will make me very happy. But don’t judge my career by these four fights. Take a look at all my 61 fights and then decide where I belong in the history of boxing.”

PACQUIAO: ‘MARQUEZ DOES NOT DEFINE MY CAREER’
An eight-division titlewinner who will enter his 61st career fight, Pacquiao’s last loss before Bradley had come against Erik Morales by unanimous decision in their first of three junior lightweight bouts in March of 2005.

After that, however, Pacqauiao scored 10th- and third-round stoppage over Morales, the two triumphs over Marquez, knocked out Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto and Ricky Hatton, and decisioned Marco Antonio Barrera, whom he also had knocked out in 2003.

Pacquiao shed light on what it means to face Marquez, yet again, during his HBO-distributed training blog.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30: “If you would have told me in 2004 that I would be fighting Juan Manuel Márquez in 2012 — and for the fourth time — well, I would not have believed it. But here we are, and for a good reason. Our previous three fights have been great — great for us and great for our fans.

“Unlike my three fights against Erik Morales, which were fought closer together and at the same weight, Juan Manuel and I have battled each other at three different weight classes, and always at important points in our careers. There is a certain feeling of destiny in our rivalry. It was meant to be that we fight each other four times.

“All of my fights with Márquez are important. He is a legend. Perhaps the best fighter México has ever produced next to Julio César Chávez. But Márquez does not define my career. My career is defined by many significant victories.

“World titles in eight different weight divisions and knockouts of Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto, Erik Morales, Marco Antonio Barrera, and Ricky Hatton mean as much to my career as my victories over Márquez.

“Champions are competitors first and foremost. They want to win. They need to win. I have put everything into this training camp. I know I haven’t fought perfect fights against Márquez in the past, and my incentive in this one is to fight the fight I should fight this time.

“If I do that, I will not only win again, but put away all doubts in the minds of the fans and Márquez on who is the better fighter. I want everyone to know the old Manny Pacquiao is still alive in the ring. Speed and aggression will be my main weapons, and if the knockout presents itself to me, I will go for it, as many times as it takes.

“What does this fourth fight with Márquez mean to me? It means the chance to author the final chapter of a marvelous story and to look forward to writing a new chapter in my ring life.”

MARQUEZ STOPS BY ESPN
As part of the all out media blitz for the Pacquiao bout, Marquez made an appearance on “ESPN Nacion,” which is hosted by

Bernardo Osuna in Los Angeles, before heading to Las Vegas, where he is expected to arrive on Tuesday.

SAUL ‘CANELO’ ALVAREZ PICKS MARQUEZ OVER PACQUIAO

NEW YORK — While sitting at ringside for this past Saturday’s unanimous decision victory by undefeated Austin Trout over Cotto, unbeaten Mexican WBC junior middleweight beltholder Saul “Canelo” Alvarez offered his thoughts on what will transpire in Pacquiao-Marquez IV.

“I think that it’s very difficult for Pacquiao to fight Marquez because of Marquez’s style, and that Marquez has a good shot at winning and he will do everything possible to win this time, and I think that Marquez is going to win,” said Alvarez, who looks to return to the ring on on May 4.

“I think that Marquez has won the last two fights. We support each other as fellow boxers and countrymen, so in regard to boxing, it would be great for history to get two, big wins in a row. It would be tremendous if Marquez could beat Pacquiao, and then, for me to follow that up with a victory in May.”

 

http://ringtv.craveonline.com/blog/176263-lems-latest-pacquiao-nba-stars-mingle-on-tnt

Marquez KO loss looms–Pacquiao

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By Roy Luarca
Philippine Daily Inquirer

HOLLYWOOD—This should serve as a stern warning to Juan Manuel Marquez.
Manny Pacquiao has set Dec. 8 as the date when he’d hand the Mexican icon a final, decisive beating to end what was perceived by many to be a seething ring rivalry.
“May (He has an) expiration date,” Pacquiao told Manila-based sportswriters after Saturday’s (Sunday in Manila) sparring and workout at the Wild Card Gym here.
With Marquez insisting on his claim that he won their first three bouts, Pacquiao no longer hides his desire to knock his opponent out come fight night at the MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas.
Pacquiao came close to it when he fell Marquez thrice right in the first round of their first duel in 2004 only to settle for a controversial draw following a judge’s lapse in scoring.
He was able to floor Marquez again in the third round with a left hook in their rematch in 2008 to scrape out a split decision, but failed to knock down the four-division world champion in their third showdown which he won by majority decision last year.
The highly disputed result has emboldened the 39-year-old Marquez, who promised to give Pacquiao a beating in their PPV (pay-per-view) welterweight fight staking no title, but is being embellished by a Diamond Belt being dangled by the WBO through its president Francisco “Paco” Valcarcel.
Pacquiao, who’ll turn 34 on Dec. 17, however, is determined to silence Marquez’s loud mouth.
“I’m 100 percent (ready),” said Pacquiao, who even did his morning run at Griffith Park. “Maintain na lang.”
Though already famished, Pacquiao spent time with ardent fan Josh Borja, a 14-year-old wheelchair-bound Filipino stricken by cerebral palsy from Glendale, California.
Marquez has also declared himself in tiptop shape in his bid to prove that he’s got Pacquiao’s number and that the judges erred in handing the eight-division world champion the draw and the two wins in their previous fights.
For Pacquiao, however, Marquez’s flaunting time is about to expire on Dec. 8 as stamped.

 

http://sports.inquirer.net/74613/marquez-ko-loss-looms-pacquiao

Pacquiao looks sharp, ready to go

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By Ronnie Nathanielsz

WITH one week to go before he takes on Mexican legend Juan Manuel Marquez at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Fighter of the Decade Manny Pacquiao looked sharp in sparring and is ready to go.

Strength and conditioning coach Alex Ariza told the Manila Standard that Pacquiao looks good.

“He is sharp and looks ready to go, definitely,” said Ariza.

Pacquiao sparred four rounds with Frankie Gomez and another four rounds with one of the Roman twins in a training session that was watched by the Filipino boxer’s wife Jinkee.

Pacquiao also did a couple of rounds on the punch-mitts with Filipino trainer Restituto “Buboy” Fernandez, who does a good job in making him throw flurries of punches and move constantly.

Despite the sparring, Ariza described the Saturday training at the Wild Card Gym of trainer Freddie Roach as “a light workout, not too bad,” since Ariza has been advocating that Pacquiao “slow down a little bit.”

Ariza said he believes Pacquiao knows what he wants.

“I’m sure he does. Go in there, target this guy (Marquez), keep pushing, pushing, pressure, pressure. Don’t let this guy think,” said Ariza.

The strength and conditioning coach recalled that legendary Mexican Julio Cesar Chavez Sr. told him recently that Pacquiao should return to being “ a street fighter and let his hands go.”

Ariza remembers Chavez Sr. telling him “the problem with Manny is he thinks too much and when he does some things he gives Marquez time. But when Manny loosens up and lets it go, Marquez looks lost. He didn’t know what to do at times. That’s Manny Pacquiao.”

Chavez added: “You don’t know what he’s doing when he throws so many punches. You don’t have time to figure and set up a counter punch because it’s boom-boom-boom and its coming from everywhere.”

Pacquiao was also a smash hit in New York as the Top Rank crew broadcast live on a seven-storey screen in Times Square an unprecedented training session last Friday from the Wild Card Gym.

 

http://manilastandardtoday.com/2012/12/03/pacquiao-looks-sharp-ready-to-go/

Pacquiao vs. Marquez: Why Pac-Man Must Finish JMM Early

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BY DONALD WOOD

When Manny Pacquiao (54-4-2) squares off with Juan Manuel Marquez (54-6-1) at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas on Dec. 8, it will be the fourth installment of what has become one of the most memorable battles in boxing history.

This time, though, Pacquiao has no intentions of letting this fight go the distance; not after he was robbed by the judges in his previous fight against budding star Timothy Bradley.

If Pac-Man wants to answer all the doubters that say the veteran fighter has lost his edge, he needs to take the fight to Marquez in the early rounds and finish JMM with a vicious KO.

Hall of Fame promoter Bob Arum told Chris Robinson of the Examiner about what the difference is between the previous three fights and how Pac-Man is approaching the final fight against JMM:

Understand what’s happened here, is the first three fights, Pacquiao won two and one was a draw. So, the one who was complaining about the officials was Marquez. Now, after the [Tim] Bradley fight, when everybody, including Manny, saw himself winning it easily, and it goes the other way, now Manny is troubled about the officials.

You have two fighters who don’t trust the judges and they’re going to take it in their own hands. You’re going to see two guys fight aggressively and go for a knockout. It means that Marquez is going to forget about counterpunching and go after and attack Manny. Marquez feels he has enough strength now, that he can take out Pacquiao. It’s not going to be anything like the first three fights.

Say what you want about Arum, but his comments are right on the money.

Not only does Pacquiao want a knockout win in this fight to answer the critics and regain his confidence, Marquez views this as his last chance at glory and will be fighting for a quick victory as well.

The kind of aggressive style needed for a KO victory will leave both men open to get hit by counterpunches, and each has to be ready to receive plenty of damage in their quest for a knockout.

Marquez and Pacquiao both have iron jaws, and they will need them in this bout.

While JMM has the experience and in-ring style to keep Pac-Man at bay, this is a different Pacquiao; he is fighting angry again and will be all over his opponent.

That’s bad news for Marquez.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429056-pacquiao-vs-marquez-why-pac-man-must-finish-jmm-early

Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez: Greatest Moments in Rivalry

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BY ETHAN GRANT

Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez are set to square off for all the bragging rights on December 8. After three bouts that have only clouded the futures of the two great fighters, we still have plenty of great moments from their rivalry.

The case could be made that this is the best boxing rivalry of all time, even without the results of the fourth match immediately available.

The two fighters have poured their souls into the three 12-round fights, and each time it appears the outcome is mired in controversy. Pacquiao has taken the last two fights by split and majority decision, and the first bout between the two men ended in a draw in 2004.

Marquez hasn’t been able to break through to the judges and get that pivotal stretch of rounds that would give him any of these fights, though the third match between the two in 2011 was arguably one of the best back-and-forth brawls the sport has ever seen.

It’s hard to rank these moments individually, and with a whole new set of memories coming our way from Las Vegas on the eighth, it’s better just to look back at the greatest moments from the first three fights.

First, here’s an HBO Sports look at both fighters’ careers. Marquez, the Mexican puncher who has transitioned from a technical fighter to a true power threat over the course of his career, is looking to cement his place at the top of boxing lore and prove that the first three fights weren’t indicative of who he is as a boxer.

For Pacquiao, now a politician in his native Philippines and looking for one last big win before we decide the fate of Pacquiao/Floyd Mayweather, he must stave off questions of slowing down after a controversial loss to Timothy Bradley in June.

Pacquiao/Marquez I

At the conclusion of this fight, we could tell this was going to be an instant classic—but not one that was ever going to get to a third rematch.

In the first round, Pacquiao knocked down Marquez three times. The fight looked over, and Pacquiao looked well on his way to defending a title and getting back in the training ring. But not so fast, sir.

Marquez responded in the middle rounds, landing a big hook that will be remembered as the punch that really started this whole feud in a different direction than the early rounds.

At the conclusion of the fight, it was clear that Pacquiao’s three knockdowns would give him a big edge, but a botched scorecard ended up leaving this one in a draw.

Pacquiao/Marquez II

The two fighters felt each other out a little bit in this one, and this might have been the roughest fight of the three so far.

The pivotal moment came in the third round, when Pacquiao once again knocked down Marquez with a huge southpaw left that caught him right across the chin.

Over the course of the fight, several moments stand out, including the 12th-round showdown where both men were taking and throwing out punches that would have ended a fight between two mere mortals within a few seconds. It was a great precursor to the third fight, where all would (hopefully) be decided.

Pacquiao/Marquez III
In the fight that the world swears Marquez won, the beefed-up Marquez struck early and often in the fight. But in one of the greatest tactical errors in boxing history, he pulled his foot off the gas and let Pac-Man take the final two rounds away from him.

The Filipino won by majority decision, and those two points on two of the scorecards (114-114, 115-113) were the difference between a win and another draw.

One of the marquee moments was how timid Marquez was in those final two rounds—completely opposite from the first 10 rounds.

So there you have it. There’s plenty of footage and history between the two men to make for a great fight in Vegas. They’ve promoted, practiced and put each other down enough to settle this thing in the ring.

It’s for all the marble when the two men enter the ring next Saturday night.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429348-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-greatest-moments-in-rivalry

Pacquiao-Marquez: Now and 4-Ever

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by Charles Saunders,

“Should old acquaintance be forgot …” Even though New Year’s celebrations are still less than a month away, on this coming Saturday, the “old acquaintance” between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez will be far from forgotten. The two pound-for-pound standouts and future Hall of Famers will meet for the fourth time to try to determine once and for all which of them is the better fighter.

The record says it’s Pacquiao. After all, he won decisions in the two of their three previous encounters, with the other ending in a draw. As well, Pacquiao scored the only knockdowns in those fights: three in the first round of their first bout (the one that ended in a draw) and one in the second.

Fan opinion, on the other hand, is divided. Some believe Marquez should have gotten the nod in the second two fights, and also that the Mexican scored a moral victory by holding Pacquiao to a draw in the first one after that disastrous first round. In their third meeting, which took place in November of last year, it appeared that Marquez had done enough to earn an unequivocal victory. The judges thought otherwise, and the transcendently popular Pacquiao suddenly heard boos from the crowd.

Since that controversial duel, the fighters’ paths have taken different directions. Rather than take on a fourth fight with his nemesis, Pacquiao chose to fight the young, undefeated Timothy Bradley. Bradley ended up winning an upset decision that was as controversial as Pacquiao’s over Marquez. Payback? Poetic justice? What-goes-around- comes-around? Who knows? The bottom line is, Pacquiao’s image as the top pound-for-pound fighter in the world lost a lot of its luster.

Meanwhile, Marquez swallowed his dismay and went on to defeat the respected Serhiy Fedchenko for something called the interim WBO light-welterweight championship (don’t ask).

Pacquiao’s choices were to face either Bradley or Marquez again, or retire. A mega-fight with Floyd Mayweather is, by now, just a mirage. Although an immediate rematch with the upstart Bradley made more sense, Pacquiao opted to continue his “old acquaintance” with Marquez.

So, what will happen on December 8? Well, before their third fight last year, I was certain that Pacquiao would prevail in a manner much more decisive than the outcomes of their first two matches. I believed that Manny had become a bigger, stronger, smarter fighter than he had been before, while Marquez was beginning to show his age (he’s 39 going into Saturday’s contest). Marquez “had Pacquiao’s number” in terms of possessing the style and strategy to give Manny fits, win or lose. But Pacquiao seemed to have progressed to the point where he would be able to overwhelm the Mexican.

As it turned out, Marquez still had Pacquiao’s number, and Pacquiao wasn’t able to impose his will as he had on most of his other opponents. Pacquiao got the points on the judges’ scorecards, but Marquez made his point with the audience and fight fans in general.

And that’s what is likely to happen again. Somehow, Marquez is able to mess with Pacquiao’s head better than anyone else can. Whatever tactics Pacquiao and trainer Freddie Roach concoct in the gym end up going out the window once Pacquiao and Marquez face each other in the ring. It’s as though Marquez knows how to make Pacquiao doubt himself.

Aggression is the only card Pacquiao can play. That’s what impressed the judges who voted for him in the three earlier fights, and it will impress them this time, too. Pacquiao will win again on a close call. Marquez will again be bitterly disappointed. The fans will again be deeply divided. And that’s the way it will always be with these two great, evenly matched “old acquaintances.”

By the way, Pacquiao and Marquez are fighting for the WBO’s newly minted “Fighter of the Decade” belt. Will the madness ever cease?

 

http://boxscorenews.com/pacquiaomarquez-now-and-ever-p51636-68.htm

Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez: Latest Buzz Surrounding Both Boxers

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BY PATRICK CLARKE

If history is any indication, then Saturday’s fourth bout between Manny Pacquiao (54-4-2, 38 KOs) and Juan Manuel Marquez (54-6-1, 39 KOs) won’t teach us anything except for the fact that the two fighters are legendary adversaries.

With three fights and 36 rounds in the books, it looks as if Pac-Man and Dinamita will have one last opportunity to provide boxing fans and experts with a lasting image of where they stand in this epic rivalry. Although Pacquiao has won the last two after the initial draw, not one of the past three results has been free of controversy.

With less than a week remaining before Pacquiao vs. Marquez IV on Dec. 8, here we get you caught up on the latest buzz surrounding both fighters.

Manny Pacquiao

Despite Manny Pacquiao’s brilliant boxing career, many have begun doubting the 33-year-old since his controversial defeat against Timothy Bradley last June.

One writer, Philippines-based Pacquiao expert Ted Lerner offers up a reason for Pac-Man’s perceived decline over the last few fights. Lerner believes that Manny has lost his “spark” in recent years and isn’t the same fighter he once was (via ESPN.com’s Nigel Collins):

I don’t think the spark is there anymore. He’s found religion, politics and business, and now has many other interests away from the ring. Clearly that special edge that made Manny a once-in-a-generation phenomenon has faded considerably and will continue to fade if he continues to fight.

Lerner does make a great point. In recent years, Pacquiao’s focus has been split in different directions, and perhaps that has led to a less effective Pac-Man inside the ring. He’s never lost two fights in a row, nor two fights in the same year, so Dec. 8′s Marquez bout will be a telling one in terms of where Pac-Man’s focus is.

A lot of experts around the sport of boxing have questioned the timing of Pacquiao’s religious rebirth, including ESPN.com writer Nigel Collins:

If Pacquiao were a banker, bricklayer or schoolteacher — anything but a boxer — his born-again, goodie two-shoes reformation would have been the feel-good story the media portrayed in countless cookie-cutter articles. But for a fighter, especially one as ferocious as Pacquiao at his best, such a transformation could be disastrous.

Collins makes another key point about the new and improved Manny Pacquiao. The biggest question left to be answered is how all of his recent lifestyle changes will impact his performance in the ring?

We’ll have an answer soon enough.

Juan Manuel Marquez

Juan Manuel Marquez knows Manny Pacquiao better than any other boxer who has faced him over the years. And according to a recent interview with EastSideBoxing.com, Marquez is expecting to beat Pac-Man at his best:

I am expecting the best Manny Pacquiao. I know the last three times I fought the best Manny Pacquiao. Of course he wants to be on top again so he wants to win the fight. But I am preparing myself very well but I will win the fight on December 8th.

It’s not surprising that Marquez would essentially guarantee victory in the days leading up to the fight. Clearly the last three bouts against Pacquiao have given him confidence that he can beat Manny.

Marquez went on to say that he’s looking to knock out Pacquiao this December (via EastSideBoxing.com):

I am going to be aggressive in this fight. I won’t go for the knockout right away but if I get the opportunity for the knockout I will go for one. I will fight with intelligence and I will also be a counter-puncher. And you need to fight intelligently to get a knockout. To win the fight clearly, I need to get a knockout.

Thirty-nine of Marquez’s 54 career wins have come via knockout. But there has yet to be a knockout in this series, which suggests Dinamita is rather ambitious to anticipate a knockout of Pac-Man the fourth time around.

Most recently though, Marquez came under fire from Pacquiao trainer Freddie Roach, who accused Marquez of using performance-enhancing drugs. Marquez quickly denied the accusation though (via USA Today’s Jon Saraceno):

I think it’s disrespectful when people start rumors like this. I have never done this type of work before. That’s why my body has changed. I have been working very hard, specifically to get more strength. Angel is a professional and knows how much weight I am putting on. I am getting more speed and getting stronger at the same time.

Roach’s accusations were based on Marquez’s increased muscle mass and hiring of controversial strength and conditioning coach Angel Hernandez, who in the past supplied PEDs to Marion Jones and Tim Montgomery, according to Saraceno.

Buzz Wrap Up

Aside from the traditional back-and-forth trash talk, the pre-fight conversation is being dominated by Manny Pacquiao’s recent lifestyle changes, which are causing many to wonder what sort of Pac-Man we’ll see against Marquez this coming weekend.

On the other side, Marquez has made it known that he will be much more aggressive in the fourth fight, and that despite the accusations from Pacquiao’s camp, he is not using PEDs to get an edge.

Keep it right here for more of the latest buzz surrounding both fighters as Dec. 8′s pay-per-view showdown draws near.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1428877-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-latest-buzz-surrounding-both-boxers

Floyd Mayweather JR – Manny Pacquiao BOXING SHOCKER – They are NOT Boxing’s Pound for Pound Best

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By Vinnie Franklin

Yo, check this out. After watching Miguel Cotto put on blast last night by my friend, the LEGENDARY Austin Trout, I began to think. YA HEARD. If Cotto gave Floyd all that trouble and Trout got the win that easy, what does that say? That says that Floyd isn’t what we all think he is. Manny Pacquiao isn’t what his nuthugging, knob-slobbering, ball-grinding fans think he is. They are not the 2 best in the game and now all of those that think that Canelo Alvarez can beat Floyd should bet the house on it. YA HEARD!

Miguel Cotto is not a man’s man. The way that he complained after being put on blast last night was a disgrace. Just take the loss and I’ll call off the dogs Miguel. You may never admit this, but Austin Trout is better than you ever were.

It’s time for Floyd to pick an opponent and get in there and mix it up. They are talking about Robert Guerrero in there and he ain’t afraid of no ghost. YA HEARD.

Floyd is a great businessman, but he needs to man up and show that he is the best in the game by taking on Canelo. Forget Trout, Canelo…take on and take out Floyd…his time has come and gone. Knock out the illusion that is the money man. YA HEARD!

 

http://ringsidereport.com/?p=25401

Cotto vs. Trout: Letdown Proves Junito Should’ve Fought Manny Pacquiao

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BY DAVID DANIELS

Miguel Cotto ultimately turned down millions of dollars to lose to Austin Trout.

The only thing that stood between Cotto and a rematch with Manny Pacquiao was pride. The Puerto Rican fighter let it get the best of him, and, as a result, he just lost to the least prestigious competitor of his career.

Dan Rafael of ESPN reported in early October that not Juan Manuel Marquez, but Cotto was Pacquiao’s first choice to fight this upcoming Saturday. Cotto-Pacquiao II didn’t happen, though, because Junito felt disrespected by Bob Arum’s proposal.

According to Rafael, Arum claimed to have offered Cotto $13 million to fight Pacquiao—a number that the fighter denied. Cotto argued that Arum never planned to pay him any more than what he received from his bout with PacMan in 2009. And on top of the money, Arum allegedly asked him drop down to 150 pounds. Per ESPN, Cotto said:

If he wants a big name and wants to fight the best, no catchweight. Making catchweights is easy for them. They make the other guy have trouble making weight and they take advantage of that. I wasn’t going to do that again. I am 154 pounds. I am not going to fight at a catchweight and make myself weak.

Now, don’t get it twisted—Trout proved that he was a worthy opponent winning by unanimous decision. But that doesn’t change the fact that, in hindsight, Cotto should’ve definitely just fought Pacquiao.

Sure, he would’ve had to lose weight. Did Cotto really opt for much better, though? Instead of being slightly weakened against Pacquiao, he chose to compete against a fighter in Trout whose reach is five inches longer and is five years younger.

The logic isn’t there.

And so what if he would’ve lost to Pacquiao too? It wouldn’t have hurt his legacy as much as a loss to Trout, who, prior to Saturday night’s fight, was only ranked No. 8 on ESPN’s list of the top junior middleweights.

Cotto got less dough to suffer a greater letdown. It’s safe to say that he’d love a mulligan.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429934-cotto-vs-trout-letdown-proves-junito-shouldve-fought-manny-pacquiao

Will Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez IV be Different than the First 3 Fights?

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By Alex Groberman

The first three fights between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez were nothing if not controversial. Both men performed incredibly well each time, and both made strong enough cases for themselves to earn victory in the eyes of their many, many supporters.

Ultimately, when it was all said and done, the pair fought to a draw in their first bout, and then Pacquiao went on to claim wins in the next two.

Despite the fact that he has yet to actually beat his Filipino counterpart, Marquez maintains that he has been robbed by the judges on three separate occasions. Many of the fans who have religiously followed this rivalry for years would agree that the judges gave Pacquiao an extra nudge in their fight last November; however, it was a very light nudge. Both men did enough to win, and usually when that is the case, the decision goes to the champion.

The one point that everyone who enters this discussion without bias comes back to, though, is that it is impossible to be robbed three times. You can definitely be robbed once, and if Pacquiao-Marquez III was the only time these two had ever fought, Marquez might have a case. Unfortunately, when you have failed to record a win over the same guy on three separate occasions, regardless of how impressive you looked each time, it’s hard to make the case for judging malfeasance.

All of that being said, something good may come from Marquez’s belief that the judges have robbed him of three wins versus Pacquiao. Similarly, something good may come from the way that Pacquiao was robbed against Timothy Bradley. Bob Arum accurately noted what those good things would be during a recent interview with Chris Robinson of The Examiner:

“Understand what’s happened here, is the first three fights, Pacquiao won two and one was a draw,” said Arum.

“So, the one who was complaining about the officials was Marquez. Now, after the [Tim] Bradley fight, when everybody, including Manny, saw himself winning it easily, and it goes the other way, now Manny is troubled about the officials.

“You have two fighters who don’t trust the judges and they’re going to take it in their own hands,” Arum added.

“You’re going to see two guys fight aggressively and go for a knockout. It means that Marquez is going to forget about counterpunching and go after and attack Manny. Marquez feels he has enough strength now, that he can take out Pacquiao. It’s not going to be anything like the first three fights.”

Arum’s point can’t be stressed enough. Any sense of comfort that Pacquiao may have had about getting an extra push from the judges is gone now. He has to go all out – just like Marquez. That is what could make this bout different from the first three.

What do you think: will this one end with a KO? Or are both men physically incapable of downing each other at this point in their careers?

 

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/sports/boxingmma/will-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-iv-be-different-first-3-fights

Pacquiao vs. Marquez: No Odds or Line Is Worth Betting on Dinamita

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BY ROB GOLDBERG

If you are planning on placing a bet on the big Dec. 8 fight between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez this week, it would be smart to avoid betting on Marquez.

The two have met in the ring three times before and they have been some of the closest fights of the past decade.

While the first ended in a draw, the other two matches came to a decision with Pacquiao ending up on top.

This trend will only continue after the fourth contest in this rivalry.

Marquez has been great throughout his career, but he has never been able to win against the elite competition. Although it is little to be ashamed of, he has an 0-3-1 combined record against Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather.

One primary reason for these struggles is his lack of elite speed to match his technique. At 39 years old, that ability has only gotten worse.

In the last fight against Pacquiao, Dinamita was able to throw 436 punches. This was 142 less than his opponent over the course of the match, according to BoxingScene.com.

Even though Marquez was able to land at a higher percentage, he did much less damage and it showed up on the scorecard.

Then when it came to power punches, he could not stay with Pac-Man and was only able to land 39 percent compared to the 43 percent by his competition.

A year later, both fighters have aged a bit, but Pacquiao still has the speed to stay ahead in the match.

The other problem that Marquez could have is the increased focus from the former champ. Pacquiao admits that his head was not completely on the fights in previous matches.

In an interview with ABS-CBN News, the Filipino star discussed the adjustments he has made:

These past fights, I’ve been involved in different lines of work. There’s entertainment, TV hosting and politics. I lost my focus in training…I will be focusing more on training for this fight even to the extent of killing myself at the training camp.

If he is truly completely intent on winning this fight, Marquez might not have a chance.

Pacquiao is incredibly tough to knockout, as he has only lost twice in his career due to a stoppage, and never since 1999.

This means that the Mexican will have to win on points, and that does not seem likely. He is likely to be severely outnumbered in the amount of punches landed and he does not have the ability to cause too much damage on his opponent.

In addition, the judges have certainly favored Pacquiao in these matchups, and that is unlikely to change in this one.

While this match is likely to be close with these highly competitive fighters, Pacquiao will once again come out on top like he has so many times throughout his career.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1429394-pacquiao-vs-marquez-no-odds-or-line-is-worth-betting-on-dinamita

Video: Watch ‘Pacquiao-Marquez IV 24/7′ episode 3

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BY: MARV DUMON

On Monday, the Filipino boxer and congressman will conclude his final day of training camp with a media reception for U.S. congresswoman-elect Tulsi Gabbard. The Democrat from Hawaii is the first Hindu-American elected to congress. She will arrive at Freddie Roach’s Wild Card Boxing Club at 2:00 p.m. in Hollywood, Calif.

Pacquiao, the sole congressional representative of Sarangani province in the Philippines, endorsed Gabbard’s candidacy for the U.S. house of representatives. She won in a landslide victory in last month’s elections and will represent Hawaii’s 2nd District. Hawaii is a blue state that typically elects Democrats to political offices.

The 31-year old is an Iraq war veteran who served two tours and was elected to the state house of representatives in 2002 at the age of 21. Gabbard is the youngest person ever elected to the Hawaii state legislature.

 

http://www.examiner.com/article/video-watch-pacquiao-marquez-iv-24-7-episode-3

MANNY PACQUIAO ROCKS TIMES SQUARE – BOXING NEWS

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By: Ashley White

Filipino fight sensation Manny Pacquiao went for a workout with Hall of Famer trainer Freddie Roach at the Wild Card Gym in Hollywood, California. The workout was broadcasted live on a seven story screen in Times Square, New York.

The workout session was produced by Top Rank in association with MLBAM. It lasted for an hour, showing Pacquiao working hard and fast against Roach. The workout session was a promotional event for Pacquiao’s fourth fight against arch rival Juan Manuel Marquez. The former WBO welterweight titlist will face Marquez for the fourth time, having won two fights out of three while the first one went into a tie.

Pacquiao has already promised fans that he would end Marquez with a knockout

“I know that I have to be intelligent, fast and strong to beat him. But as we have seen in the first three fights, it is not just up to me to win the fights. It is up to three judges who score the fights. There is no doubt in my mind that I won all three previous fights with my skills and smarts in the ring but the judges have denied me that victory,” said Marquez, who believes it is about time to put an end to the rivalry.

Not just Marquez, even Pacquiao is well aware of the fact that this fight will be a tougher one than ever before. Pacquiao knows he has to win the fight by hook or crook, since he is coming off a controversial loss to Timothy Bradley.

Pacquiao and Marquez fought for the third time last year. Pacquiao won the showdown via split decision but most analysts and fans believed Marquez had outboxed Pacquiao. It was the first time the Pacman had the hear crowd’s boos in the arena.

For now, Pacquiao has promised fans and his mentor Roach that he would knock out Marquez by being speedier and more aggressive than ever. According to Pacquiao, the only way to put a definite end to the rivalry is by stopping Marquez instead of relying on the judges. Pacquiao knows it is time for him to score a dominant win and not a split decision win again.

 

http://blogs.bettor.com/Manny-Pacquiao-rocks-Times-Square-Boxing-News-a204996

Marquez’s coach plans to sue Roach for defamation

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ABS-CBNnews.com

MANILA, Philippines – The strength and conditioning coach of Juan Manuel Marquez is threatening to sue boxing trainer Freddie Roach for claiming that the Mexican may have used steroids.

Angel “Memo” Hernandez, who started working with Marquez in the 3rd Manny Pacquiao fight, said Roach may have been using psychological war tactics by accusing the Mexican of using performance enhancing drugs (PEDs).

“What he is doing is a tactic because Roach thinks he’s so funny. Juan Manuel wants to fight and shut their mouths,” said Hernandez in Boxing Scene.

However, the conditioning coach said Pacquiao’s trainer is liable for defamation.

“The fact is, I’m going straight to the federal laws, and I talked to my lawyers yesterday and it is a fact that Freddie Roach will be sued for defamation. We are ready to proceed,” said Hernandez.

Roach earlier said he could not believe that Marquez bulky physique did not benefit from drug use.

What roused the trainer’s suspicions on Marquez’s rapid muscle growth are the Mexican’s ties with Hernandez, who reportedly supplied PEDs to former track stars Marion Jones and Tim Montgomery.

“If [his body] is natural, I will kiss his ass,” Roach told Jon Saraceno of USA Today.

But the boxing coach later backtracked from his statement, saying that he was merely joking.

Ironically, Roach’s fighter Pacquiao filed a defamation suit against Floyd Mayweather Jr. for insinuating that he used PEDs.

Mayweather later retracted his statements and opted to settled the case with Pacquiao.

 

http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/sports/12/01/12/marquezs-coach-plans-sue-roach-defamation

Pacquiao Aching To Face JMM

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By NICK GIONGCO

Manny Pacquiao wished he’d be able to get his hands on Juan Manuel Marquez the soonest.

The feeling is mutual, according to Marquez, who is about to wrap up his training in Mexico City as he prepare to board a private plane that will bring him and his team to the US on Saturday.

Pacquiao sparred a total of eight rounds on Thursday (Friday in Manila) at the Wild Card Boxing Club and left everyone thinking that the Filipino star simply can’t wait to face Marquez for the fourth time.

Nine days before their much-awaited clash at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, both fighters have already reached their peak and from now until next week, what they’ll do is maintain their current condition.

Pacquiao, who turns 33 nine days after the fight, sparred eight rounds on Thursday and is due to add four to six rounds on Saturday and probably three on Monday, the day he leaves for Las Vegas.

Marquez just concluded his sparring sessions at the Romanza Gym in Mexico City but is showing up for workouts in the next two days.

A private plane is fetching Team Marquez in Toluca and they’re expected to set foot in Los Angeles on Saturday. That same plane will bring them to Sin City on Monday.

Marquez will no longer work out once he gets to Las Vegas and will do most of his training behind closed doors – inside the confines of his suite at the MGM Grand –according to publicist Ricardo Jimenez.

Top Rank chief Bob Arum dropped by the Wild Card with resident matchmaker Bruce Trampler and they were amazed with what they saw. The 80-year-old Hall of Fame promoter will again show up on Saturday, adding he can’t get enough of Pacquiao’s intensity.

While Marquez will keep the media and public at bay in the final days, Pacquiao will hold his last few days of training at the Top Rank gym.

 

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/383813/pacquiao-aching-to-face-jmm#.ULqhweQ3uSo

Roach closes Wild Card doors for Pacquiao training

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By Roy Luarca
Philippine Daily Inquirer

HOLLYWOOD—Freddie Roach may be happy with the way Manny Pacquiao has been training, but the uninvited throng sneaking into the sweaty Wild Card Gym here during the afternoon sessions has frayed his nerves.
Roach has now ordered security chief, Rob Peters, to enforce a closed-door order on Saturday afternoon when Pacquiao spars for the penultimate time before wrapping up training camp and motoring to Las Vegas on Monday.
“I’m sorry guys,” Peters told Manila-based sportswriters over dinner at Nat’s Thai restaurant, around 30 meters across the famed gym. “There were so many people and hangers-on last Thursday that he (Freddie) was pissed off. He didn’t want a repeat of such situation.”
This was confirmed by publicist Fred Sternburg, who relayed to select Filipino reporters that the Thursday crowd was even bigger than when Pacquiao hosted the media on Wednesday.
If any consolation, Peters said the doors would be opened to the public and journalists as soon as Pacquiao’s sparring is over.
Pacquiao is into the tapering phase of his preparations for his fourth showdown with Juan Manuel Marquez on Dec. 8 at the MGM Grand Arena, but Roach still wants no distractions if possible.
Earlier reports had it that Pacquiao was so intense in his training that he posted a total of four knockdowns against his sparmates, including unbeaten welterweight prospect Frankie Gomez (13 wins with 10 knockouts), since his arrival in Los Angeles on Oct. 29.
A video posted on YouTube two weeks ago featured a ripped Marquez also knocking down a sparring partner.
Though the knockdowns would cost Roach $4,000 in friendly wager with Pacquiao, the Hall of Fame trainer doesn’t mind a bit.
Roach wants the old Pacquiao—fiery, aggressive and relentless—back against Marquez.
With Pacquiao coming off an unexpected loss to unbeaten American Timothy Bradley in June, Roach sees a knockout win by Pacquiao as a form of vindication.
According to Cebu-based promoter and Pacquiao confidant Rex “Wakee” Salud, who arrived here on Friday evening (Saturday in Manila), he’d never seen the eight-division world champion so “focused” in training for a long time. “Even when he started his physical buildup back home in Gen. Santos City.”

 

http://sports.inquirer.net/74403/roach-closes-wild-card-doors-for-pacquiao-training

Bob Arum reveals why Pacquiao-Marquez IV will play out differently than expected

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BY: CHRIS ROBINSON

Having seen his star fighter Manny Pacquiao in camp in Los Angeles several times over the past few weeks, Top Rank CEO Bob Arum claims that the eight-division champion is looking nearly as good as he has ever seen him.

Pacquiao faces off with Juan Manuel Marquez for a fourth time inside of the MGM Grand in Las Vegas on Dec. 8 and Arum spoke to me about a Tuesday training session he witnessed while inside of the famed Wild Card Boxing Club.

“I was really impressed,” Arum would tell me of Pacquiao on Thursday afternoon as we spoke at Yuriorkis Gamboa and 50 Cent’s media day at the Fortune Gym. “Because he had a full sparring session and this is the best I’ve seen him look in years.

Bob Arum discusses Pacquiao-Marquez IVBob Arum discusses Pacquiao-Marquez IV
“I can attest that one session that I watched, he knocked down a sparring partner,” Arum added. “I don’t know about the other [reported knockdowns], but I saw him knock down a sparring partner.”

Having been singing Pacquiao’s praises in camp, Arum was asked what it is he sees in his fighter that is so remarkable this specific camp.

“He’s quicker, he’s move aggressive, and he’s punching harder,” stated the Hall of Fame promoter.

All three Pacquiao-Marquez duels were all high-octane affairs that left people split on who was the real victor after 12 rounds of action. In each bout, Marquez used his counterpunching prowess to nullify Pacquiao’s aggression, creating for a tense and often electric atmosphere.

And while Marquez was left complaining following all the encounters, so too was Pacquiao left befuddled this past June after he dropped a split-decision and lost his WBO welterweight title to unbeaten Tim Bradley.

That disputed loss alone is reason enough for Arum to believe that Pacquiao’s psyche will be completely different heading into yet another crucial meeting with Marquez.

“Understand what’s happened here, is the first three fights, Pacquiao won two and one was a draw,” said Arum. “So, the one who was complaining about the officials was Marquez. Now, after the [Tim] Bradley fight, when everybody, including Manny, saw himself winning it easily, and it goes the other way, now Manny is troubled about the officials.

“You have two fighters who don’t trust the judges and they’re going to take it in their own hands,” Arum would further explain. “You’re going to see two guys fight aggressively and go for a knockout. It means that Marquez is going to forget about counterpunching and go after and attack Manny. Marquez feels he has enough strength now, that he can take out Pacquiao. It’s not going to be anything like the first three fights.”

 

http://www.examiner.com/article/bob-arum-reveals-why-pacquiao-marquez-iv-will-play-out-differently-than-expected

Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez: Pac-Man Will Prove to Be Boxing’s Best

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BY ALEX BALLENTINE

There’s always a lot of talk surrounding the best pound-for-pound boxer in the world. After Manny Pacquiao defeats Juan Manuel Marquez for a third time, Pac-Man will have made his case that he’s the best in the world.

To take it one step further, another win over Marquez will cement Pac-Man’s legacy of being one of the greatest of all time.

Boxing has had its fair share of legends. From Muhammad Ali to Sugar Ray Robinson, they’ve all had their personal rivalries that pushed them to that next level and created some of boxing’s most memorable moments and matches.

For Pacquiao, no rival has been more intertwined in his legacy than Marquez. Despite holding a 2-0-1 record against him, it has always felt like they’ve been equals. The first fight, an instant classic, ended in a draw. The next two fights saw Pacquiao named the victor but were covered in controversy and really could have gone either way.

The fourth encounter will go a long way in deciding how boxing fans look at the whole history of this rivalry.

A decisive win for Pacquiao justifies those that feel Pacquiao won the second and third fights. A loss for Pacquiao and those who feel Marquez won the second and third fights will have more credence to their claims.

Furthermore, how Pacquiao fares in the fight will impact how we view the latter part of his career.

There’s no questioning Pacquiao’s impressive resume. He’s been atop the sport for more than a decade now. He’s the only boxer to ever hold titles in eight different weight divisions. His staying power has been more than impressive, and he’s made a case that he’s the best of all time.

However, after a controversial decision loss to Timothy Bradley, the way we view the end of his career is in serious jeopardy against Marquez. If he is unable to beat Marquez this time around, the perception will be that he has held on too long.

Nothing hurts a legacy more than trying to hold on for too long.

When we think of Evander Holyfield, we don’t just see his brilliant performances against Mike Tyson, Buster Douglas and Riddick Bowe, we unfortunately see three straight losses to Chris Byrd, James Toney and Larry Donald.

When we think of Mike Tyson, we see the dominant performances of his youth, but we also can’t shake the image of a much older Tyson being battered by Lennox Lewis or getting knocked out by Danny Williams and Kevin McBride.

When history looks at the greatest boxers of all time, there is a penalty for holding on too long. If Pacquiao can notch a convincing win to close out his rivalry with Marquez, he will show that he is capable of finishing out his career with the same dominance that he performed throughout it.

 

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1427561-manny-pacquiao-vs-juan-manuel-marquez-pac-man-will-prove-to-be-boxings-best